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Memorable Motorcycles - Honda 350 "4" Photo Gallery

Memorable Motorcycles - Honda 350 "4" - Based of the four-cylinder racer that dominated Grand Prix at the hands of Jim Redman and Mike Hailwood

Slideshow
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After two years of production, the elegant 350 '4' was phased out.
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The 1972 Honda 350 '4' instruments on display.
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Sophistication apart, the '4' is rather a good motorcycle too.
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In terms of appearance, it was not one of the most breathtakingly beautiful motorcycles of its generation but neither was it ugly.
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The engine is electric smooth all the way up to the 10,000rpm redline and the power curve is gentle and progressive.
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The 350cc four-cylinder motor is what set the Honda apart from the rest of the crowd.
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The 350 Four's main opposition came from Honda's own 325cc CB350 Twin.
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It handled reasonably well, never tried to bite the rider and the only fault was that the disc pads of the time did not particularly like gripping the stainless steel front disc.
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The legend, or maybe even the truth, attached to the little Honda is this: You have to remember that in 1972 'Pops' Honda was still very much part of the Honda factory.
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Based of the four-cylinder racer that dominated Grand Prix at the hands of Jim Redman and Mike Hailwood, the CB 350 Four was a short-lived design, surviving only two years after its 1972 debut.
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Honda's four-cylinder 350 was a bike just like this. At the time of its launch, it missed every single target - except one which, after the years rolled by, has turned out to be its ace card.