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2010 Modified Superbike Comparison Photo Gallery

How much better can one really make today’s big-bore sportbikes? We aim to find out as we take three class-leader machines in various states of tune for our Modified Superbike Comparison.

Slideshow
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Take a look the horsepower numbers our three Superbikes pulled on the dyno. Even the bone-stock Aprilia pulls over 150.
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The Ducati 1098R trumps the field in terms of torque, with 90 lbs-ft-plus at the rear wheel. Though for an Inline-Four the 81.3 lbs-ft from the Yosh the Suzuki equally impressive.
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VBox speed data gathered during a controlled five-lap run on the stock Aprilia RSV4 Factory, showing the best lap.
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VBox speed data gathered during a controlled five-lap run on the Ducati Performance 1098R, showing the best lap.
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VBox speed data gathered during a controlled five-lap run on the Yoshimura Suzuki GSX-R1000, showing the best lap.
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Yoshimura's EM-Pro data technician was on hand to dial in our ECU.
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Ducati brought out a fully-kitted $75,000 1098R for our comparison, showing up with the pinnacle of what one can do in the Ducati Performance catalog.
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Forged magnesium wheels reduces unsprung weight for added flickability and acceleration, while Pirelli’s latest slick tires provided the adhesion factor.
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Ohlins’ FGR800 gas-charged fork graced the front of the Ducati, along with forged Brembo brakes; say hello to any sportbike junkie’s wet dream.
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You too can have one of these amazing machines. For 75-large!
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A Ducati Racing slipper clutch keeps the back end in line when under extreme braking and downshifting situations.
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Spent gasses are expelled through a massive set of Termingnoni exhausts, which are both effective at making power and beautiful to behold.
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An Ohlins TTX shock handles rear suspension duties quite effectively. Note the trick rearsets. Those bad boys are over $1000 for the pair!
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One of the best V-Twin motorcycle we've ever had the pleasure of riding. Note the massive Superbike-spec braced swingarm, which allows the use of a big slick tire.
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Massive aftermarket triple clamps are needed to house the Ohlin gas-charged forks and allow for three-way geometry adjustability.
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The 1098R Superbike retained the stock dash, which gives the rider more-than-enough information.
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Yoshimura fork extenders were added to the stock Suzuki Showa front end to allow for additional geometry adjustability.
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Yoshimura added a Showa Factory Kit rear shock as well as one of its flat-rate linkages to help cope with the additional 30-hp produced by the project GSX-R.
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While still looking very stock from the outside, our Stage 1 Yoshimua GSX-R100 hides quite the beast under its skin.
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MotoUSA's Yoshimura Suzuki GSX-R1000 project bike Stage 1.
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Yoshimura frame sliders and engine case guards help protect our investment.
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Yosh's R-77 full racing exhaust system not only makes impressive power gains but sounds amazing.
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For the first stage in our project bike we elected to keep things street-legal to show just what is possible from a road-going machine. Stay tuned for Stage 2 where we go full-race mode.
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We left the wheels stock, though in the braking area we swapped out the pads and lines for some street-oriented Galfer units.
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Pirelli’s amazing Diablo Supercorsa slick ties provided mind-bending levels of grips at Willow.
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Ohlins Road&Track fork comes stock on the Aprilia RSV4 Factory.
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Brembo radial-mount calipers provided impressive braking power on the RSV4.
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The Aprilia’s massive exhaust may be the only unflattering piece of the whole motorcycle.
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Like we said, there isn't much that doesn't look stunning about the new Aprilia.
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It may be on the heavy side, but the low-slung and compact V-Four engine keeps the CG down and makes awesome power.
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2010 Aprilia RSV4 Factory in all its glory.
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There's no question the new Aprilia will go down in history as one of the best looking sportbikes ever made.
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An Ohlins rear shock sits out back in the Factory version of the RSV4.
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A look at the new Aprilia's cockpit.
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Three liter-class sportbikes, three different states of tune. How do they compare?
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The Yosh machine takes to the track at Willow Springs.
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The Yoshimura GSX-R proved to be extremely stable when crank on its side.
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Though stability was comparison-leading for the Yoshimura GSX-R, it lacked some in terms of flickability compared to the others, which we will be working to remedy in Stage 2.
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MotoUSA VP Ken 'Hutchy' Hutchison instantly fell in love with the all-new Aprilia RSV4 Factory.
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Road Test Editor Waheed felt comfortable on the Ducati right away, even with its whopping 170-plus horsepower and 90-plus lbs-ft of torque.
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The Ducati's chassis is without question the bike's shining point, which is amazing considering the monster motor it hides within.
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The Ducati Performance 1098R goes flying into Turn 2, one of the areas where the Italian steed gained a lot of time compared to the other bikes.
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While the GSX-R was ultra stable and massively fast through Turns 8 and 9, in the slower Turn 2 the slightly sluggish steering held it to the back of the group.
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Turn 2 is an area that really shows a bikes prowess mid-corner, and the stock Aprilia performed amazingly.
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The Ducati Superbike’s natural breeding ground: Slammed on its side mid corner.
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There was no shortage of achievable lean angle from the Ducati/Pirelli slick combo.
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Road Test Editor Waheed rode the RSV4R in Italy, but commented that the Factory felt noticeably faster at Willow compared to his ride on the 'R', though very little is different between the two engines. wise.
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The Yoshimura GSX-R1000 was quite eye-opening in Stage 1 form, and we eagerly await Stage 2.
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The Ducati 1098R Superbike transitioned from side to side with the flickability of a 600.
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Corner-exit acceleration from the V-Four Aprilia was astonishing to all who rode it, especially considering the company it was keeping during this comparison.
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Who doesn’t love that planted feeling of a Ducati Superbike mid-corner? The 1098R has one of the best chassis currently produced.
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Does it get any better than this?