MotoUSA WMX Sara Price Interview

June 22, 2010
By Farrah Bauer
Kawasakis Sara Price battled shoulder to shoulder for fifth-place with Elizabeth Bash at Freestone where she eventually took a 5-5 score.
Sara Price finished Freestone fifth overall despite riding with an injured shoulder.

As Round 3 of the WMX at Thunder Valley in Colorado is approaching this weekend, we managed to track down Factory Kawasaki rider Sara Price in between practices for a little one-on-one. Sara is currently sitting sixth-place in the provisional point standings. She has earned 51 points after two rounds and even though she’s been injured, she’s been riding hard and fast.

MotoUSA: Thanks for taking some time and talking with us. You finished 5-5 at Freestone for a fifth overall. Can you talk about that race from your perspective?

Sara Price: Yes I finished 5th overall, it was a really tough race for me. I’ve been off on an injury with a messed up shoulder since before Hangtown and unfortunately reinjured myself at Hangtown. It has been a bummer because I was coming into the season so ready to race. Because of the injury I wasn’t able to do much on my motorcycle the two weeks we had in between Hangtown and Texas. Texas was rough because it’s a very brutal race with the heat and my injury circumstances. Freestone tests your endurance. I have good cardio but body-wise due to my injury I wasn’t 100%. I did my best and I still got good points so I was pumped on that.

MotoUSA: Well for being injured and not having a lot of practice time on the bike, you performed exceptionally well. You’ve been a Kawasaki rider for sometime now. Can you talk about your team and how you feel being supported by a factory team has helped your career? 

Sara Price: Besides my first bike which was an XR50, I actually have only ever ridden a Kawasaki. I grew up going through the ranks of the amateur side of Kawasaki Team Green. Its been a great honor to be making history as the first woman racer under Factory Kawasaki and also to share the tent with a very accomplished racer like Chad Reed. The team is awesome and they are like a second family to me. I feel so welcome with all the support they give; it’s a great feeling to have a loyal relationship, not only myself to Kawasaki but Kawasaki to me throughout my career. 

MotoUSA: It’s great to hear stories that prove long-term relationships still exist. What is your training/practicing routine? 

Sara Price in the season opener of Womens Motocross at Hangtown.
Sara Price: “Its been a great honor to be making history as the first woman racer under Factory Kawasaki and also to share the tent with a very accomplished racer like Chad Reed. The team is awesome and they are like a second family to me.”

Sara Price: I currently train with Randy Lawrence. I usually ride four-five days a week. We do a lot of road biking which I’m fairly new to, but I’m having a lot of fun working my way up on the road bike. [laughs] Those things are gnarly. I also do a lot of gym activities to work on strengthening and rehabilitation for any injuries I might have. It’s a very solid program I have going on right now, and I’m very excited about it. 

MotoUSA: Let’s hope you’re all healed for Thunder Valley. What is your strategy for getting on the podium in Colorado? 

Sara Price: I’m going to be riding very hard during our weeks off then I’m hoping to get all my kinks out with this injury before hand. I’ll be shooting for the holeshot and a solid race; doing my best and going for the win. Of course I’m always trying to go as fast as I can and at the same time keeping it on two wheels. [laughs]

MotoUSA: Do you feel that the WMX should follow all 12 rounds of the AMA Pro Motocross Championship instead of the eight that are currently scheduled? 

Sara Price: I think that the women racing the eight rounds is fair considering they are putting us in the program and we are being treated just like the Lites (250) and Motocross (450) classes. In the future I would definitely like to see us do more rounds and it would be great to see the women’s motocross step into Supercross one day as well. 

MotoUSA: When it comes to racing what do you feel are your strengths and weaknesses? 

Sara Price rode through the pain of an injured shoulder at the 2010 MX season opener at Hangtown  finishing 11th overall.
Sara Price: “My strengths are definitely being an aggressive rider. I’m also a very hard worker and do the absolute best I can all around. Overall I would say I’m a very strong racer.”

Sara Price: My strengths are definitely being an aggressive rider. I’m also a very hard worker and do the absolute best I can all around. Overall I would say I’m a very strong racer. I’m a 100% GRRRR [laughs]. I would say the only weakness is going crazy when I have to deal with injuries. 

MotoUSA: Can you talk about how you got your start in racing? 

Sara Price: Well my dad was a Baja racer in race cars, and we lived down the street from Josh Grant; Josh and my brother Dean were best friends back in the day and he got my brother into racing and they were always racing on the weekends. At this time I was into horses, which I still have my horse, Garnet, today, but my dad saw my talent and my competitiveness and he bought me my first bike, an XR50, and since then it’s been on! 

MotoUSA: It’s great to have family members who recognize your talent and support your career. What is your advice to young girls who might want to start racing? 

Sara Price: Don’t be scared to get out there and follow your dreams and goals. Anything is possible and remember to always be safe and have fun.

MotoUSA: Many racers do quirky things before a race. Do you have any pre-race rituals or superstitions? 

Sara Price: I hate to say but I think I have a little OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) when it comes to some things. I’m a perfectionist, but before a race I have to say “I love you” to my parents. 

MotoUSA: I think that’s one of the most important and sentimental pre-race rituals I’ve heard. What is your favorite part of racing pro motocross? 

Sara Price: I would have to say the competition. Throughout the amateur ranks it was great racing but nothing was as challenging as the pros because the tracks are so much rougher and more technical that you better know what you’re doing. All the pros know the lines like outsides to inside unlike in the amateurs, where racers ride right down the middle. In the pro level all the lines you think would be smooth are usually the roughest cause everyone who races on the track on race day knows what they are doing and which lines are the quickest. 

MotoUSA: Yeah I think picking a good line comes with experience and trial/error. What is your least favorite part of racing? 

During Fridays media day at Hangtown Price crashed and re-injured her shoulder. Despite this Sara took an impressive sixth-place finish in the first moto.
Sara Price: “Throughout the amateur ranks it was great racing but nothing was as challenging as the pros because the tracks are so much rougher and more technical that you better know what you’re doing.”

Sara Price: I would have to say the money. We have sports like NASCAR where racers can earn $35,000 for last place. They’ve also got a lot of outside sponsors that bring in much more wealth to their sport. I would love to see motocross evolve to where not only the men can make a very comfortable living for just qualifying into the main event but also where the women make their mark as well. I basically want to see our sport get even bigger. 

MotoUSA: Well I think we’re on the right road to that scenario. Hopefully we’ll get there someday. Thank you very much for taking the time to speak with us. One last question, is there anyone that you would like to thank? 

Sara Price: Definitely, Monster Energy Kawasaki, Pro Circuit, Thor, Parts Unlimited, Scott USA, Renthal, Maxima, Dunlop, Alpinestar, Auto Styles, Corn Fed, and my family most of all.

Thanks Sara and good luck in Colorado!