Shinko 010 Apex Comparison

February 3, 2015
Adam Waheed
By Adam Waheed
Road Test Editor|Articles|Articles RSS|Blog|Blog Posts|Blog RSS

His insatiable thirst for life is only surpassed by his monthly fuel bill. Whether rocketing on land, flying through the air, or jumping the seas, our Road Test Editor does it all and has the scars to prove it.

 

The Korean-made Apex has the distinction of being the only sub- 300 tire in this contest.
Probably the single element that held it back from a more favorable result was how much flex the carcass transmits.
Probably the single element that held it back from a more favorable result was how much flex the carcass transmits.

Shinko submits its 010 Apex tire for the A group. Arriving on dealership floors in 2010, the Apex is designed to appeal to sport riders on a budget. It utilizes a uniform compound formula with a racy, minimalistic tread pattern for maximum grip on dry roads.

The Korean-made Apex has the distinction of being the only sub-$300 tire in this contest. Not only is it less than half the cost of the high-priced Pirelli SP, it’s $75 cheaper than its own cousin, the Verge 2X (B group) despite being positioned higher in Shinko’s sport tire lineup.

But you get what you pay for, as a pair of Shinkos are easily the heaviest, weighing a whopping 2.3 pounds more than the next heftiest (Bridgestone S20) and just over four pounds more than the ultra-light SP. They’re even heavier than the porkiest B group tire, the Verge 2X.

Profile-wise the Apex isn’t as sharp handling as the other brands, yet we wouldn’t classify it as terrible. Probably the single element that held it back from a more favorable result was how much flex the carcass transmits. Though to be fair that flex equates to improved feel through the controls of the motorcycle.

Despite running near the hottest part of the afternoon, the Apex took considerable time to arrive at the ‘average minimum operating temperature’ (see Objective Scorecard Glossary sidebar) requiring just over 4.5 minutes to heat up on either track. Still, they slotted in above the slow-warming Bridgestone S20, but were well adrift of the hot-to-trot Dunlop Q3.

Based on its so-so handling and grip, the Apex lap time of 1’32.1 around the main course came as a surprise – besting both the Michelin and the Avon Xtreme 3. The next day, however, it ranked one position lower on the timesheets, barely beating the Avon by a scant 0.1 second. When combined, the Apex ended up grabbing the fifth fastest time overall.

For its price, it’s hard to argue with the value Shinko offers with its Apex. Yeah, it’s heavy. Yeah, it doesn’t offer the refined handling manners of

For its price  its hard to argue with the value Shinko offers with its Apex. Yeah  its heavy. Yeah  it doesnt offer the refined handling manners of the other big name brands. But at the end of the day the Apex gets the job done.
For its price, it’s hard to argue with the value Shinko offers with its Apex. Yeah, it’s heavy. Yeah, it doesn’t offer the refined handling manners of the other big name brands. But at the end of the day the Apex gets the job done.

the other big name brands. But at the end of the day the Apex gets the job done. So despite finishing seventh in the rankings, the Apex is still a winner in our book.

RIDER NOTES:

“It felt like it had a little bit gummier and softer rubber. The carcass felt a tad bit softer and it didn’t have that nice, rigid, pointy feel that many of the other tires had. This tire had really good grip but it just felt a little too mushy. I did like how communicative it was. Although it moved around over bumps, it let you know as it was happening so you could expect it. Grip was really great on the fat part of the tire but side grip was a little inconsistent. Stability was so-so because of how much it squirmed over bumps.”

The Shinko 010 Apex is available at Motorcycle Superstore.

 

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