Shinko 016 Verge 2X Comparison

February 3, 2015
Adam Waheed
By Adam Waheed
Road Test Editor|Articles|Articles RSS|Blog|Blog Posts|Blog RSS His insatiable thirst for life is only surpassed by his monthly fuel bill. Whether rocketing on land, flying through the air, or jumping the seas, our Road Test Editor does it all and has the scars to prove it.
Shinko delivers an affordable dual-compound sport tire with its 016 Verge 2X.
Another strike is the unusual profile which gives inconsistent feel as the tire transitions onto the edge.
Low subjective scores and the worst-in-class lap times sent the Verge 2x to the tail end of the B-group.

Shinko delivers an affordable dual-compound sport tire with its 016 Verge 2X. Released last year, the Verge 2X sports a modern looking tread pattern with intricate sipe patterns and twin compound zones. This gives riders the best of both words: good mileage and resistance to wear during the work week commute and a gummier footprint at lean while strafing corners on the weekend.

Within the B-group, the Verge is the least expensive tire carrying a price of $321.90 per set. Curiously, it is a few dollars more expensive than its sport-oriented Apex sibling (A Group), despite being positioned lower in Shinko’s model lineup.

Front tire weight is comparable to both the Avon and Bridgestone, but 11 ounces lighter than Metzeler’s Sportec M5. Conversely, the rear hoop weighs nearly a pound more than its closest competitor (Bridgestone’s BT-016 Pro). Together the dual-compound Shinkos are the heaviest of the group.

The Shinkos proved the least maneuverable through turns, requiring the most effort for direction changes (though to be fair: the Verge featured a shorter 50-aspect ratio as it isn’t offered in a 55-designation). Another strike is the unusual profile which gives inconsistent feel as the tire transitions onto the edge. This made it difficult to trust the available grip, which, despite ranking at the back, was adequate.

The Verge also lagged behind in the ‘Warm-Up Time’ scoring category. Specifically, the front tire took in
excess of 3.5 minutes to arrive at its ‘average minimum operating temperature’ (see Objective Scorecard Glossary sidebar) at either circuit. Although rear warm-up times were far more competitive (25.7 and 67.3 seconds, respectively) it wasn’t enough to offset its worst-in-test front warm-up time.

In terms of lap times the B-group Shinkos trailed the timesheets at both tracks, registering a lap time of 1’37.9 seconds on the big course and 1’29.1 seconds at the Streets. For reference, that was 4.5 seconds off
the Bridgestone (big track) and 3.9 seconds off the Avon (Streets).

Low scores in each of the subjective categories, along with its worst-in-class lap times, relegated the Verge 2X to the tail end of the B-group. However, if the majority of your rides entail plenty of freeway miles, the budget-oriented Shinkos could fit the bill.

The Shinkos proved the least maneuverable through turns  requiring the most effort for direction changes.
The Shinkos proved the least maneuverable through turns, requiring the most effort for direction changes.

RIDER NOTES:

“This tire has the capability to be good but it needs some serious work on the profile and carcass… very unusual front profile. Tall and flat feeling initially but as you lean into turns it falls onto its side so quickly that it feels like the front tire is folding underneath you. It was hard to get a feel for edge grip because the tire felt so awkward on its side. And paired with its flexy carcass it just feels sketchy. For drag racing and straight riding this tire would work great. But if you plan on attacking corners it doesn’t have enough stability.”

The Shinko 016 Verge 2X is available at Motorcycle Superstore.

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