Scorpion EXO-R2000 Helmet Review

Byron Wilson | March 6, 2015

The Scorpion EXO-R2000 is available in a variety of graphics,
including solid color options and race replicas.

Scorpion set out to significantly up its helmet game developing the EXO-R2000. The company worked with Grand Prix racers like Alvaro Bautista, Jack Miller and Mika Kallio to fine-tune details of the lid, with particular focus on aerodynamics, ventilation, fit and protection. And while it’s a piece of kit developed by and for racing, the EXO-R2000 feels just as much at home during the morning commute or up through the hills on a weekend ride. It’s also affordable, pricing at $379 for a solid-color version, $10 bucks more for a graphic version and $430 for race-replica versions.

Before we got our hands on a “Circuit” graphic EXO-R2000 in late 2014 and using the lid as our daily rider, we got the lowdown on the development of the R2000 from one of Scorpion’s reps. The final product took about three years of development, with a portion of that period dedicated to refining the company’s Thermodynamic Composite Technology. The TCT process makes use of a five-layer blend of interlaced fiberglass, Aramid and other organic poly-resin fibers to create the outer shell.

Scorpion offers four shell sizes and six EPS liners to optimize fit for a range of head sizes. The company also developed its AirFit Liner Inflation System to enhance fit for the infinite variety of head and face shapes. Remember the old Reebok Pumps? It’s a similar concept, with an inflation button situated inside the chinbar that allows riders to customize fit once the helmet is on. It’s definitely a stand-out feature of the lid, and for me it takes about five pumps to get the helmet feeling really snug. When you’re ready to pull the helmet off, simply press the air release button, also located inside the bottom of the chinbar.

The only knock I can give in terms of fit has to do with the chinbar itself. My nose comes right to the point of touching the upper lip of the chinbar. It made for a claustrophobic feel initially, but since it never caused any serious discomfort the issue dropped from my radar after a few uses. Otherwise, the EXO-R2000 is a very comfortable lid.

The R2000’s fantastic ventilation increased comfort immensely. The channeled EPS routes plenty of air from the six front intake ports out the 10 exhaust ports. Get above 40 mph with all the vents open and a steady stream of air pushes over the crown of your head. It’s a welcome surprise to feel just how much air moves through the lid at speed.

While ample amounts of air get in through the vents, Scorpion designed an Ellip-Tech Ratchet system to keep air from seeping in around the faceshield when closed. The shield is pulled back against the eyeport gasket when locked, creating a tight, secure seal.

On the bike, the R2000 feels like an extension of your body. The field of vision is wide and there was never a sense of anything blocking my periphery. It’s quiet and stable at speed and doesn’t get jerked around when turning for a look behind. The titanium double D-ring closure stays nice and tight throughout a ride and the lid’s great ventilation prevents fogging very well.

Other nice touches include the KwikWick II anti-microbial fabric used for the comfort liner, which is easily removed for cleaning if needed. There are also KwickFit cheekpads with grooves to allow easy on/off for glasses.

The EXO-R2000 is Snell M2010 and DOT approved and has stood up to some epic GP rider wrecks (check out Bautista’s practice crash at Indy in 2014 for an example).

For less than $400 dollars, Scorpion offers a race-grade lid with premium-level features and top-notch fit and finish. Overall it’s a great deal in our estimation, and the EXO-R2000 will definitely remain in heavy rotation during the coming riding season.

Get the Scorpion EXO-R2000 Circuit Helmet at Motorcycle Superstore for $389.95.

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Byron Wilson

Associate Editor | Articles | Byron's sure to be hunched over a laptop after the checkers are flown, caught in his own little version of heaven. Whether on dirt, street or a combination of both, MotoUSA's newest addition knows the only thing better than actually riding is telling the story of how things went down.

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