2016 Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin Peek

Byron Wilson | May 12, 2015
Honda has confirmed the return of its Africa Twin to the U.S. lineup as 2016 model. The new CRF1000L, revives a moniker popularized in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s thanks to the company’s XRV650 and its successor, the XRV750.Honda signaled its intensions for a true adventure mount during the 2014 EICMA show when its mud-spattered True Adventure concept was unveiled alongside the 1989 Paris-Dakar-winning NXR Africa Twin and Honda’s latest rally weapon, the CRF450 Rally. At that point, Honda would only say that the True Adventure represented the product direction it aimed to take “to expand its presence in the Adventure segment.”

Few details are mentioned in Honda’s press release announcing the Africa Twin’s return, with the only technical tidbit mentioned referencing “the option of a new evolution of Honda’s Automatic Dual Clutch Transmission.” Photos don’t reveal much either: a set of handguards, a radiator, inverted forks, a snub-nosed front fairing underneath dual headlights and adjustable windscreen. The engine platform appears to be a Parallel Twin.

The release stresses that the “new Africa Twin remains true to all the attributes and abilities of the XRV650 and its successor, the XRV750, while adding the benefits of everything Honda has learned on and off-road over the last decade, including Team HRC’s return to the Dakar in 2013.”

Does this suggests the new Africa Twin will sport the larger, 21-inch off-road front wheel, long-travel suspension and dual-front disc brakes found on the old XRV750? Is Honda bringing an adventure bike to market that will challenge the Super Tenere or V-Strom?

Check out the photos below to see what Honda’s willing to reveal of the new Africa Twin at this point and stay tuned for a full First Look when complete details are available.

Byron Wilson

Associate Editor | Articles | Byron’s sure to be hunched over a laptop after the checkers are flown, caught in his own little version of heaven. Whether on dirt, street or a combination of both, MotoUSA’s newest addition knows the only thing better than actually riding is telling the story of how things went down.