Honda Teases “Project 2&4” Powered by RC213V

Byron Wilson | August 26, 2015

Honda is now teasing a collaborative prototype between the company’s two- and four-wheel divisions with its Project 2&4. Being a tease, there’s not too much to it at this point, but here’s what we know from the press release distributed earlier today.

The Project 2&4 concept will be “powered by RC213V.” How close the engine will be to the RC213V currently competing in MotoGP is up to speculation. Honda did release a production RC213V-S earlier this year, but came under no shortage of criticism for neutering the engine, promising just 101 horsepower in the U.S. The qualifier “modified for public road use” Honda uses in describing the RC213V of Project 2&4 leads us to believe it will cant more toward the S-version rather than the GP version.

Project 2&4 is “a winner of the global design competition run by Honda between its global design studios.” Honda’s motorcycle design center in Asaka, Japan and its automobile design center in Wako, Japan are credited as the collaborating entities responsible for Project 2&4.

The concept will be a “cabin-less structure” which promises to provide “an immersive driving environment combining the experience Honda has in providing the freedom of a motorcycle and the maneuverability of a car.”

And that’s about it. From the top-down image Honda has provided, we expect to see something akin to an F1 car. This is bolstered by the livery, which is clearly an homage to the 1965 Honda RA272, the machine that provided the marque its first ever F1 win when Richie Ginther took the checkers at the Mexican Grand Prix. 2015 is also the 50th anniversary of this achievement. Coincidence?

The full machine will be unveiled during the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show, set to start September 17, 2015.

Honda Project 2&4

Byron Wilson

Associate Editor | Articles | Byron’s sure to be hunched over a laptop after the checkers are flown, caught in his own little version of heaven. Whether on dirt, street or a combination of both, MotoUSA’s newest addition knows the only thing better than actually riding is telling the story of how things went down.