Drag site icon to your taskbar to pin site. Learn More

2013 MV Agusta F3 675 Supersport Comparison

Monday, June 17, 2013


Videos Our Sponsor
2013 MV Agusta F3 Track Shootout Video
Click to view video
MV Agusta has its sights on the Supersport Shootout crown with its 675cc F3. Will this all-new Italian hot rod have what it takes to vie for the No.1 spot? Click play on the 2013 MV Agusta F3 Track Shootout Video to learn more.
After years of hype MV Agusta finally enters the middleweight fray with its 2013 F3 ($13,999). The fresh- faced MV follows Triumph’s successful middleweight formula with its own version of a 675cc Inline Three engineered to offer the best of both worlds: The mid-range torque of a Twin and the hard-hitting top-end of a four cylinder. The F3 also incorporates advanced electronics inside an exceptionally compact package.

Rolling the F3 onto the scale proves it's one of the more hefty bikes in this group. With a full tank of fuel it weighs 427 pounds—12 more than the class-leading CBR600RR but six less than the porky EVO-spec Ducati. Out on track, however, the MV impresses with its above average maneuverability. It steers into corners easily and offers pin-point line selection accuracy. The MV’s ergonomics, highlighted by its slim seating position, well-shaped fuel tank, wide handlebar and high mounted foot pegs were also well received with Wooldridge thinking that the MV’s ergos were the best of the bunch:

“The MV was the first bike I rode on the first day while learning the track and I got a good evaluation of the bike at a slow pace. The ergonomics and seating position is awesome… by far, the best in the test for me.”
The F3s handling was toward the front of the pack however its suspension proved to be the limiting factory in its road holding potential.
The two-piece Brembos offered plenty of stopping power as well as feel through the lever. However the limited damping of the fork proved to be the weak link in an otherwise strong braking package.
The MV delivers a strong stream of top-end power which helped it achieve high top speeds before braking for turns.
(Top) The F3’s handling was toward the front of the pack, however its suspension proved to be the limiting factory in its road holding potential. (Center) The two-piece Brembos offered plenty of stopping power as well as feel through the lever, but the limited damping of the fork proved to be the weak link in an otherwise strong braking package. (Below) The MV delivers a strong stream of top-end power which helped it achieve high top speeds before braking for turns.

“It was such a different feel, a different sound, a different feel of the motor. I wasn’t really sure what to expect,” recalls Jen Ross, our lady test rider, before she turned any wheels on the MV. “But once out on track everything came together—turn-in was a breeze.”

When pitched over on the tires’ side, especially through Turns 4/5 and the Turn 13 bowl, the F3 exhibits a very high level of mid-corner stability. And the more it leans, the better it feels. Data shows the MV records the second-highest corner speed through these sections while simultaneously carrying the second-least degree of lean (56.7). This indicates the MV’s chassis is so adept at cornering that it doesn’t require as much lean angle as the others. Curiously, in the second to last corner the F3’s corner speed was third from the bottom, which may be attributed to its under-damped suspension. Although we were generally pleased with the way it steered, the second-slowest flick rate as measured in Turns 8/9/10 proves it isn’t quite as agile as the others.

“For me it’s the bike with the most potential in the shootout,” reveals Pridmore. “It handles good, it’s nimble—I love the seating position and ergonomics of it.”

While our testers generally agreed that the MV handled well, its suspension components prevented it from achieving a faster lap time. The fork and shock don’t offer the precise level of damping found on the others. The suspension was compliant and tracked well over bumps, but it lacked the pitch control expected from a properly set-up sportbike. The result is a see-saw effect when braking and accelerating. This may have been a factor in its lowest average braking force numbers as measured at Turns 1 and 8.

Speaking of the brakes, the two-piece Brembo set-up worked well delivering a good amount of power and feel. But when compared to the more up-spec monobloc jewelry on some of the competition, the MV’s brakes were rated toward the bottom. Although the MV does without a slipper clutch, it’s engine brake control more than makes up for it, giving the F3 a freewheel sensation entering turns.

In the motor department the MV is certainly not lacking. The 675cc Triple belted out the third-
MV Agusta F3 Settings
Suspension
Fork
Preload: 6.5 (Turns in)
Compression: 1.5 (Turns out)
Rebound: 1.5
Shock
Preload: 9 (Turns in)
Compression: 1.5
Rebound: 1.75
Drivetrain
Power Mode: Custom
Traction Control: Off
Gas Sensitivity: Normal
Engine Brake: Sport
Maximum Torque: Sport
Engine Response: Fast
RPM Limiter: Sport
highest horsepower rating of 114.31 ponies at 14,800 revs—200 revs shy of redline. One nice touch the F3 offers is an adjustable rev limiter that can be set to come-in softer and less abruptly. We also loved the lightning fast upshifts afforded by the quickshifter which makes it easy to keep the engine on the pipe.

“I love the quickshifter on it,” Pridmore agrees. “That worked really well—probably better than any of the other two or three bikes [Ducati and Triumph] that actually had the quickshifter.”

“I was surprised. You turn the throttle on that thing and it friggin’ goes,” tells Neuer. “A little soft off the bottom but once it’s in the revs—snappy motorcycle.”

Strong top-end power paired with close ratio gearing, and, of course, the quickshifter helps the MV rider achieve a high top speed at the end of straightaways that were near the top of the field. Everyone loved the outright power of the MV. But it’s overly anxious throttle response and glitchy ride-by-wire, especially during deceleration, was unnerving.
The F3s powerband is flat off the bottom but add in some revs and it takes off in a hurry.
A more limited range of suspension adjustment limits the MVs handling on track. This is the one bike in the contest that could benefit from upgraded componentry from the aftermarket.
The F3 feels light in the corner and has an incredibly accurate front end. With some fine tuning this bike could be a Supersport Shootout winner.
(Top) The F3’s powerband is flat off the bottom, but add in some revs and it takes off in a hurry. (Center) A more limited range of suspension adjustment limits the MV’s handling on track. This is the one bike in the contest that could benefit from upgraded componentry from the aftermarket. (Bottom) The F3 feels light in the corner and has an incredibly accurate front end. With some fine tuning this bike could be a Supersport Shootout winner.

“I think the electronics were working against the bike,” says Neuer. “You go to let off the gas and it kind of likes to keep going [laughs]. That took a little bit to get used to. But the bike has a lot of potential.”

“The MV felt better since the last time I rode it last fall,” Colton remembers. “The only thing I had a little bit of an issue with was the low- to mid-range mapping and throttle response. The raw power it has is pretty amazing. It comes on hard and definitely feels like one of the quicker bikes up top.”

“I really enjoyed riding the MV, the quickshifter was awesome and it feels good to just sit on. But the run-on after you get off the gas is a bit unnerving,” said Carruthers.

The engine pumps out a decent peak torque figure too (47.02 lb-ft, placing it mid-pack), but the problem is it comes way up in the rev range (11,200 rpm). This makes the F3 tougher to ride at anything less than an all-out, throttle pinned to the stop pace. Its relatively low acceleration force numbers demonstrate that it lacks punch off corners, instead the MV relies on the motor to gather some straight-line steam before it really gets moving.

“It feels a little bit jerky on/off throttle—like it is a little bit too aggressive,” Zemke concurs. “But then as you roll the throttle on to exit the corner it feels like something is holding it back. It feels like the motor wants to go faster but it is choked off a bit. It ranked pretty far down on the list for me, but that was mostly down to the electronics. I think if you could control that issue the bike would have ranked quite a bit higher.”

In terms of fun and sheer excitement the F3 delivers in spades. This charismatic Italian Triple rewards its rider with a snappy powerband and a grin-inducing engine shriek that needs to be heard to believe. While many of our testers appreciated aspects of the F3, including its maneuverability and turning accuracy, its quirky throttle response along with ineffective suspension damping made it tricky to ride at the limit during Superpole. If MV could sort out some of the bugs there’s little question this bike will run up front.


MV Agusta F3 Highs & Lows
Highs
  • Ripping fast top-end power
  • Excellent mid-corner handling
  • Close gear ratios and quickshifter aid acceleration
Lows
  • Suspension lacks effective damping
  • Quirky ride-by-wire and throttle response
  • Soft bottom-end power

Dealer Locator















2013 MV Agusta F3 675 Comparison
View Gallery
View Gallery
View Gallery
View Gallery
View Slideshow
Recent Sportbike Reviews
2014 Honda VFR Interceptor First Ride
After a multi-year hiatus from Honda's US line-up, the VFR Interceptor returns to the American market with notable revisions in 2014. See how the new iteration fares on road in this First Ride.
2014 Honda CBR650F First Ride
Positioned between Honda's newbie-friendly CBR500R and racy CBR600RR, the CBR650F bridges the gap between the two with emphasis on street performance and comfort.
Sportbike Dealer Locator
2013 MV Agusta F3 Specs
2013 MV Agusta F3
Engine: 675cc liquid-cooled Inline Three 12-valve
Bore x Stroke: 79.0 x 45.9mm
Compression Ratio: 13.0:1
Fueling: Fuel Injection w/ twin injectors per cylinder
Transmission: Six-speed cassette-type with electronic quickshifter
Clutch: Wet, multi-disc w/ cable actuation
Final Drive: Chain; 16/43 gearing
Frame: Steel tubular trellis and aluminum
Front Suspension: 43mm Sachs fork with spring preload, compression, and rebound damping adjustment; 4.92 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Gas-charged shock with spring preload, compression, and rebound damping adjustment; 4.84 in. travel
Front Brakes: 320mm petal discs, radial-mount two-piece four-piston Brembo calipers
Rear Brake: Single 220mm disc, double-piston Brembo caliper
Tires: Pirelli Diablo Rosso II 120/70R17, 180/55R17
Curb Weight: 427 lbs.
Wheelbase: 54.23 in.
Rake: 23.6 deg. Trail: 3.89 in.
Seat Height: 31.96 in.
Fuel Tank: 4.22 gal.
MSRP: $13,999
Colors: Pastel White; Red/Silver; Pastel Black/Metallic Anthracite
Warranty: Two year, unlimited mileage
2013 Track Map
2013 Superbike Smackdown Weights

Login or sign up to comment.

Comments
Piglet2010   June 25, 2013 07:44 PM
@ Muzzy - Wrong, the graph shows 47.02 lb-ft at 11,200 rpm for the F3: http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/94587/Motorcycle-Photo-Gallery-Photo/2013-MV-Agusta-F3-675-Supersport-Shootout.aspx Or you can find the torque plot at the bottom of page 3 of this article: http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/100/16415/Motorcycle-Article/2013-Ducati-848-EVO-Supersport-Comparison.aspx
Muzzy   June 25, 2013 04:22 PM
um, 8 days later and the graph is still showing 14.8k HP peak for the F3 (not "peak torque" or twist force" by the way)
Superlight   June 18, 2013 09:19 AM
I purchased the F3 knowing full well that it was rough around the edges and had a lot of potential, not to mention it is (by far) the best looking bike of the bunch. I'm in the process of realizing that potential as I modify the machine, item by item.
motousa_adam   June 17, 2013 11:51 PM
You are correct: the F3’s engine delivers maximum twist force at 11,200 rpm. We will get the graph updated... Adam
Piglet2010   June 17, 2013 07:21 PM
The plot shows peak torque for the F3 at about 11,300 rpm, not the 15,000 rpm in the graph caption and article. Which is correct?