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The Ultimate AMA Flat Track Shootout Photo Gallery

In the attempt to satisfy a long-standing curiosity with Flat Track MCUSA straddles seven of the top AMA Twin bikes in the sport. Read more about the bikes and individual riders in The Ultimate AMA Flat Track Shootout.

Slideshow
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MCUSA had six of the most intimidating flat track bikes in the industry lined up for a go-around at the Arizona Mile.
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The corners at the Arizona Mile were especially dangerous with the flat track machines.
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Steve Atlas (left) defied the laws of physics multiple times while getting acquainted with flat track machines.
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The engine on the Waters Racing Suzuki was increased to a 700 and included internal engine modifications for the added size.
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The Suzuki-powered Twins tracker is a relatively new bike to flat track and is still under development.
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The biggest strength of the Suzuki SV650 was its easy maneuverability thanks to a lower seat height.
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With much anticipation and excitement Steve Atlas let the clutch loose on the first 300-pound behemoth...
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The Waters Racing Suzuki SV650 was smooth and controllable in corners.
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Waters Racing Suzuki SV650
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In addition to winning several Amateur National Championships, Chad Cose was on hand to offer advice and assistance in riding the Suzuki SV650.
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Compared to the Suzuki the KTM LC8 950 was much taller and wider.
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The KTM had a chassis setup which caused it to buck and shake while running a straight line. As a result the only way to successfully handle the bike was with it pitched sideways.
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The KTM was one bike which put our man past his comfort zone with its impresive speed and tricky setup.
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After coming just feet away from stadium walls at speeds in excess of 100 mph, Atlas affectionalety renamed the KTM the 'Austrian Assassin.'
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Just a day prior to our test, Waters Racing's Jeremy Higgins rode to his best GNC Expert Twins finish of the season in 10th place at the Arizona Mile.
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The skinny seat and dual carburetors protruding from the left side of the bike took some getting use to.
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The unorthodox right-hand shifter and brake setup on the Harley allows riders to shift while keeping their inside leg down.
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The Harley-Davison XR750, known as the king of flat track, had power delivery that was quick but also smooth and manageable.
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The XR750 had some of the most user-friendly power, allowing Atlas to test out angles and controlled slides.
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Factory Harley-Davison XR750
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While sliding the Ducati is able to control both pitch and speed, giving the machine strong handling capabilities.
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In 2009 the Ducati was fitted with a Hypermotard 1100 engine and a hand-made frame.
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Ducati's 1100cc powerplant produces power on demand and works well with the nimble chassis setup.
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The Ducati bike was agile and paired well with our tester's roadracing experience.
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Lloyd Brothers Ducati
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Fuel injection on the Ducati provided a different feel than the other carbeurated machines.
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Like the Harley, Triumph placed the shift lever on the right side.
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The Bonne lacks some of the top end power of the Kawasaki and instant acceleration of the Ducati, but comes to life mid-range.
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Bonneville Performance Triumph
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The Triumph featured the lowest seat height of the group, and made the rider feel as though they were in the bike rather than on top of it.
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Triumph's low chassis design gave the bike predictable movement through corners.
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With two bike options available MCUSA tested Kawi's Ninja 650R engine housed within a Versys frame.
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Controlling the Kawi's rear during mid-corner was difficult and required tremendous throttle accuracy.
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Monster Kawasaki Ninja 650R
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The Kawasaki took time getting up to speed but made up for this with its top end.
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The Versys chassis on the Kawasaki made it unusually wide and awkward while standing still.
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Becuase of its strong top end it was difficult reaching the 650R's max on the Mile's long straights.
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Unlike the other machines the Kawi featured an extremely long tank which pushed the rider back.
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Shawn Baer earned a best finish of ninth place at Canterbury Park in 2010.