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2011 Triumph Daytona 675R First Ride Photo Gallery

The new 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R features Ohlins suspension and Brembo brakes plus a bunch of other goodies. It looks pretty sweet so check out the photos now. Read the full story in our 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R First Ride.

Slideshow
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On the street the Daytona 675R is a good motorcycle for sure but it really compromises street comfort for track prowess based on the stiffer suspension and touchy quick-shifter - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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The engine makes great power in the mid-range as evidence by the class leading torque the bike produces in all of our previous tests. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675
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Hauling ass is what the Daytona 675Ris all about. It has the engine to back up its bold new look and the price tag to put it right in line with the competitor’s bikes. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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On the track the Daytona 675R shines. The Ohlins fork and shock are superb and with an experienced rider at the controls this motorcycle should be capable of some seriously fast lap times. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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Triumph has really embraced the performance catalog these past few years. The quick-shifter now is standard equipment on the 675R but there’s still a slipper-clutch and many other goodies you can bolt-on to this bad-boy including slip-on & full exhaust systems as well as adjustable rear-sets and much more. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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My first impression is that the Daytona 675R feels like a harder Daytona 675 with race-suspension set-up and low and behold, that’s exactly what it is. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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Wind protection is good in full tuck but there’s not much there when riding upright. The airflow actually does not buffet the rider much though. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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Triumph considers the Daytona 675 its price-point sport motorcycle with an MSRP of $10,499, an impressive $1,500 less than the R-model. 2011 Triumph Daytona 675
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If you always wanted a sweet European motorcycle with all the bells and whistles but were afraid to pull the trigger, now would be a good time to just do it. The Daytona 675R is that good. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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a fully adjustable Ohlins TTX36 shock, which was developed over the past few years in MotoGP, brings true racing technology to the real world. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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a 43mm fully adjustable NIX30 fork utilizes Ohlins’ proprietary technology separates rebound on the right fork leg and compression adjustments on the left. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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Neither the Daytona 675R nor the Daytona 675 has a fuel gauge and as far as we are concerned, that is just plain silly for a street bike - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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The Daytona 675R features go-fast hardware as well as some bling. Carbon bits include a front fender, rear hugger and the shroud around the exhaust - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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The 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R is equipped with Ohlins suspension, 4-piston Brembo monoblock calipers, Brembo master cylinder and a quick-shifter all for just $400 more than its most expensive Japanese rival.
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Daytona’s in the past have had a slightly notchy transmission so the new internals and quick-shifter appears to be a big improvement. - 2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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2011 Triumph Daytona 675R
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2011 Triumph Daytona 675R