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2004 Kawasaki Vulcan 2000 Photo Gallery

Photos of the 2004 Kawasaki Vulcan 2000. 2004 Kawasaki Vulcan 2000.

Slideshow
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Up front, a hefty 150/80 tire keeps the 2000 in the right direction while the belt drive punishes an ultra fat 200/60, the widest tire available on a large-production cruiser.
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The Vulcan 2000 is an opportunity for people to experience a combination of power and grace in a package that lists for $14,499, a whole lotta bike per dollar.
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The power cruiser market, once non-existent, has quickly become saturated with offerings from many of the world’s most recognizable manufacturers.
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Technical jargon aside, the Vulcan is nothing if not a blast to ride.
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The first thing that stands out about the 2000 is the smooth integration of the headlamp into the chrome shroud around the fork.
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The stretched 5.5 gallon gas tank gives the 2000 a clean, classic look and also provides ample fuel capacity for riders who plan to load up and leave for the day without making frequent stops at a filling station.
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With nearly 800 pounds to track through high speed corners, the suspension and rigid frame does a good job of eliminating chassis flex.
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Slowing the Vulcan is a pair of 300mm discs with 4-piston calipers.
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Relaxed, raked-back handlebars leave the arms and hands at a comfortable riding position, and it works in harmonious union with the bucket-style saddle.
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For those who ride for brotherhood and companionship, the Vulcan 2000 isn’t a good choice – it’s much too fast and fun to involve other riders with regularity.
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The suspension doesn’t seem that remarkable until the Vulcan is pushed hard through the twisties.
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As the bike exhales it emits a superb exhaust note for a stock cruiser. The aural pleasantries of the Vulcan exhaust is due in large part to a single-pin crankshaft which provides V-Twins with that classic loping potato-potato sound.
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Kawasaki opted to forgo overhead cams and instead used pushrods and four hydraulically actuated valves per cylinder to reduce engine height, helping keep mass low to the ground.
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Cruising on the 2000 is an incredible experience, with fistfulls of torque and horsepower available in the right hand in any gear at any rpm.
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Kawasaki opted to forgo overhead cams and instead used pushrods and four hydraulically actuated valves per cylinder to reduce engine height, helping keep mass low to the ground.
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The incredible displacement undoubtedly stands out, and there's little question that its power and torque will bring a smile to your face.
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Don't be misled by the moniker, the Vulcan 2000 isn't just about size, it's an amalgamation of torque, power, handling, and refinement all packaged into one 790-pound machine.
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The folks at Kawasaki didn't simply set out to build the biggest production cruiser. They wanted to create an incredibly powerful and well-handling machine that is as pleasing to the eye as it is to the loins.
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The arm-jerking power is evident throughout the powerband and peaks with a claimed 141 lb.-ft. of torque at 5000 rpm.