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2011 Ducati Multistrada 1200 S Comparison Review Photo Gallery

The 2011 Ducati Multistrada 1200 S Touring is caught on camera during the adventure touring shootout. Read the full report in our 2011 Ducati Multistrada 1200 S Touring Comparison.

Slideshow
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Because our test unit was the touring model, this bumps the MSRP to almost $20,000 right off the bat. Plus, a list of accessories adds another $3858.
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The Multistrada 1200 S Touring is built around a superbike engine and it brings levels of performance that are unfathomable for the other machines.
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Thanks to its massive motor and sporty handling, the Ducati left an impression on our testers. If it could match its performance with reliability, the Ducati would be even better.
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It can be a blast off-road, but it won’t last for long.
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The L-Twin engine cranks out almost 132 horsepower which dwarfs anything else in this comparison.
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it’s so user-friendly on- or off road. From mellow cruising at low Rs, roll it on for a smooth controllable rush or pin it and be ready to hang on. The Multistrada S has the perfect power.
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Sport mode applies full power, but the Italian also has Touring, Urban and Enduro which alters the output, traction control and suspension settings.
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While our riders unanimously slaver over the engine, the drivetrain is another issue.
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Ducati isn’t quite as dominant in the torque department, but it still easily sweeps up these competitors with just under 81 lb-ft.
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The hydraulic clutch is great, but the six-speed transmission it controls has major issues.
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Salt Lake Motorsports hooked us up with a complete rear brake assembly including master cylinder, caliper, brake line, ABS line and rotor.
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The brake to malfunction roached the disc and ultimately overheated the system enough that the backing plate fell off a brake pad.
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Some riders were able to toy with the gearbox and intentionally slip into false neutral between each gear.
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As an “S” model, the Ducati is equipped with upscale components.
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A 48mm fully adjustable fork replaces the standard 50mm Marzocchi. The Ohlins rear shock mounts to a progressive linkage and both ends are electronically adjustable.
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A 17-inch rear wheel is standard on these machines (except KTM which uses 18-inch), but the 17-inch front hoop is unique to Ducati in this test.
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It’s not surprising that Ducati’s high-dollar Ohlins fork and shock combine with an excellent chassis to provide the best overall handling of the bunch.
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2011 Ducati Multistrada 1200 S Touring Dyno
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Horsepower Dyno (All Bikes)
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Torque Dyno (All Bikes)
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0-60 Comparison
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Quarter Mile Comparison
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Weight Comparison
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2011 Adventure Touring Shootout.
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The rider is able to select base settings depending on passenger and cargo by scrolling through the electronic menu.
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With 47% of its weight bias on the front wheel, the Multistrada feels sharp and precise as it transfers side-to-side.
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Weighing in at 561 pounds (with bags), the Duc is only three pounds lighter than the BMW, but it feels significantly more svelte.