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Inside Triumph Motorcycles Hinkley Factory Photo Gallery

Take a look at how Triumph makes its distinctive Triple and Twin-powered motorcycles in the Inside Triumph Motorcycles Hinkley Factory photo gallery.

Slideshow
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Triumph's Hinkely headquarters house its main production effort, with two engine assembly lines and one chassis line.
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The first step in the production process is gathering the required parts from a pick list.
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The Hinkley site holds a vast warehouse of components. Triumph reckons more than 50% of the parts are built in house, mostly at its Thai facilities.
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Workers are responsible for the constanst resupply of parts based off the production work order.
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CNC machines pare down the raw forgings of crankshafts, camshafts, cylinder heads and other engine parts are machined to exacting tolerances.
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Critical internal engine parts undergo heat and plasma nitriding processes to enhance durability.
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Engine prouction line - Hinkley Factory 2.
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Hinkely’s Factory 2 supports two engine assembly lines. The first builds the 1050 Triple.
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The second engine assembly line at the Hinkley is dedicated to the massive Rocket III, T-16 Thunderbird Twin and 800cc Triple powering the Tiger 800.
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The Triumph Thunderbird's T-16 Parallel Twin directly challenges the Big Twins from Milwaukee.
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The engine assembly process includes quality control checks.
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About 80 line workers put the powerplants together, with an engine completed every 85 seconds.
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Two engine lines at Hinkley are complemented by the chassis line, which spits out finished bike every two minutes and 25 seconds.
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The bikes quickly take form after the frame and engine are mated.
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Rear swingarm and suspension components are added, with the front end attached shortly thereafter.
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A Triumph worker attaches the clutch lever assembly at the Hinkley Factory 2.
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A subassembly station feeds the wheels and tires to the main line, where they are ratcheted into place.
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Factory 2 can assemble about 200 motorcycles every day. That’s one every 2 minutes and 25 seconds rolling off the chassis line during peak production.
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Final assembly is where the unique nature of the Triumph process is most visible. Rocket IIIs share the line with Tiger 800s, Thunderbirds and other models.
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A new Triumph rolls off the production line at Hinkley.
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Bodywork and components like fuel tanks and fenders are finished at the Triumph paint shop, which is located in the original Factory 1.
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Triumph fuel tanks and fenders are hand-painted.
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Visual inspections ensure flaws are either discarded and redone, or polished out by hand.
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The most experienced technicians dabbing down the pinstripes and patterns on special models.
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Once completed on the chassis line bikes roll onto the dyno for a “rolling road” evaluation.
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The dyno run checks to ensure engine performance benchmarks are met.
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A Rocket III is ready to roll...
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Since its rebirth, Triumph Motorcycles has churned out more than a half million new bikes in its 21-year history.
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The last step out the factory door comes inside specially designed metal crates, which are returned for reuse at the facility.
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T-Bird just needs some finishing touches before it gets fired up and tested on the rolling road dyno.