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2012 Can-Am Outlander 1000 XT First Ride Photo Gallery

See photos of the 2012 Can-Am Outlander 1000 XT sport utility ATV in action during our first ride review. Read the full report in our 2012 Can-Am Outlander 1000 XT First Ride.

Slideshow
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Black, oversized front and rear bumpers add to the appearance and do a good job of protecting the fancy plastic.
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BRP says the Outlander 1000 is capable of towing 1300 pounds via its standard two-inch hitch receiver, and it holds 100-pounds on the front rack and 200 on the rear.
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The racks use Can-Am’s LinQ quick-attach system to accept factory accessories.
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Riders have plenty of information available to them via the digital display unit.
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The big V-Twin pushes exhaust through a large, single muffler.
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Having the RT30 comes in handy on more occasions than when simply stuck. A 50-foot steel wire rope can act as a safety line in sketchy situations, or, most commonly, it helps yard a fallen tree or fellow ATV rider out of a jam.
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A rear trunk holds 5.7 gallons of cargo and is easily one of the larger storage options we’ve seen. It uses a simple and effective latch similar to a tailgate.
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The wheels were one of the downfalls for the Can-Am as the painted aluminum surface scratches very easily. Just a few ruts and the shiny wheels look beat up.
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A CVT transmission offers High and Low range along with Park, Neutral and Reverse.
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Topping the list is Tri-mode Dynamic Power Steering (DPS). This three-position steering assist makes a huge difference in the handling character of the Outlander.
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The handlebars are a bit too wide, and they make it difficult to turn full-tilt when leaning to the inside as they interfere with the rider’s leg, hip or stomach depending on how they need to hang off the machine.
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Both front brakes (one in each wheel) and the rear brake (right wheel only) use dual-piston calipers.
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Thundering from underneath revised bodywork and a new chassis is the 91mm x 75mm bore and stroke V-Twin engine.
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Instead of wedging the big V-Twin into the existing Outlander chassis, Can-Am developed the second-generation Surrounding Spar Technology frame (SST G2).
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The CVT transmission has an engine brake feature that is perhaps the best we’ve ever tested on an ATV.
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The 230W headlights dual headlights and dual taillights crank out illumination and increase safety on the trail.
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An XT model also comes with a different spec Visco-Lok QE front differential.
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The seat is wide and cushy, making for a comfortable and leisurely platform.
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Up front are shocks with nine inches of travel using double A-arm components. Can-Am uses what it calls “dive-control geometry” for positive cornering and braking dynamics.
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We love the performance and benefits of the DPS system, and consider it a must-have upgrade for such a large, powerful ATV.
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Suspension components on the Outlander are unique. Torsional Trailing arm Independent rear suspension (TTI) is similar to the components found on the Commander
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Our trails range from hardpack roads to muddy two-track, and the three-ply Carlisle ACTs provide secure grip and a comfortable ride with minimal flex.