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2013 Kawasaki KX250F First Ride Photo Gallery

See the 2013 Kawasaki KX250F motocross bike in action as MotoUSA tests the green dirt bike at the Spring Creek Motocross track in Millville, MN. Read the full details in our 2013 Kawasaki KX250F First Ride article.

Slideshow
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For a more explosive bottom end, Kawasaki boosted the compression ratio to 13.8:1 (vs. 13.5:1).
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The new intake tract required massaging the frame, but the change riders will notice is a narrower midsection. The main spars are now 4mm narrower, bringing the rider’s knees inward.
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The clutch and ignition side covers are no longer black. Boots quickly wore off the old finish so now they are a “phantom silver” finish.
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A 4mm thinner chassis is also more rigid, which
makes for a sharp turning and stable machine.
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The exhaust outlet is 7mm wider, but KX-F officials claim it still meets the 94 dB requirement.
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A new front brake master cylinder uses a pushrod-type linkage instead of a knocker-style. The twin-piston caliper also gets new pads that create better friction on the 250mm petal rotor.
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Kawasaki adjusted the aluminum perimeter chassis with the intent of increasing overall rigidity
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Changing a coupler takes about 10 seconds. It is located on the throttle side of the steering head and requires no tools. The bike must be shut off completely and restarted, however, or else the altered mapping will not be recognized by the ECU.
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A new exhaust system graces the right side of the bike with a MegaBomb-type header which Kawi calls its Acoustic Resonator chamber.
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Kawasaki is proud of its racing heritage with the KX250F. The 4-stroke has been incredibly successful since in being introduced.
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Engineers also targeted a longer-running motorcycle by changing up the piston skirt in high-pressure areas, and installing a new spark plug cap to help keep out water and mud.
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Spring Creek Motocross plays host to the Millville Outdoor National each year; a venue capable of thrashing the best MX bikes and riders in the world. Kawasaki used the famous racetrack as the introductory proving grounds for the new 2013 KX250F.
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One of several designs carried over from the 450 is the addition of interchangeable ignition mapping couplers. The bike comes with a trio: stock (green), hard-terrain (black) and soft-terrain (white).
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Internally on the fork, the main piston (rebound) and sub piston (compression) are both larger which stemmed from increasing the lower fork tube from 47mm to 48mm.
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Kawasaki still employs the Separate Function Fork on its 250F, despite the 450 getting the fancy pneumatic system.
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Millville has a series of steep climbs and drops which put the chassis and suspension to the test.
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The upper engine mount is reshaped, though mostly to provide better access to the idle speed adjuster (which is now knurled for easier grip).
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The MX51FAJ front and MX51J rear are intermediate-terrain treads specifically designed to work with the KX250F’s handling and suspension. The “J” models are only available through Kawi dealers.
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The KX250F has plenty of power to get over the Chadapult.
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Two days on an immaculate Millville track would be great by
any standard, but aboard the 2013 KX250F it was pure MX bliss.
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Aside from the KX-F running stronger and handling better, it has the looks to match.
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We can’t feel much of a difference in terms of comfort or durability, but the new grips are each 10mm longer and Kawasaki claims they’ll actually come off when it’s time to replace them.