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2012 BMW R1200GS Comparison Photo Gallery

Take a look at the 2012 BMW R1200GS adventure touring motorcycle as it performs on the street and dirt in this ADV comparison review. Read the full report in our 2012 BMW R1200GS Comparison article.

Slideshow
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BMW started offering ABS as standard fare on all of its motorcycles this year so the R1200GS is graced with the technology.
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It’s not a bike that gets splattered with drool from gawking passersby.
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ESA allows the pilot to change damping characteristics while on the fly by simply touching a button.
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The shaft drive gave us no problems, though long-time owners have varying opinions.
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Hand guards are a great addition for any ADV bike.
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The BMW completed the 60-0 mph braking in 155.8 feet.
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The 2012 model might be the last before a major redesign of the air-cooled Boxer Twin.
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The Rallye Special Edition comes in white with a red chassis.
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The beak is one of the characteristics that has been copied.
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The seat height and wind screen are adjustable.
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The analog speedometer has tiny numbers that are difficult to read.
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Our riders were most comfortable standing on the GS, which led them to ride it more aggressively in the dirt.
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The BMW makes competitive horsepower and torque.
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The BMW edges out the Triumph in torque, but the power delivery is filled with valleys and peaks.
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The GS has a reputation as an accomplished world traveler.
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The extra punch from its Boxer Twin often allows the GS to overtake other drivers without downshifting.
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Protection from the elements is decent on the GS. The cylinders block some water from the lower legs and the windscreen is fairly wide.
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The seated position is good for long days in the saddle.
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We coaxed 98.3 horsepower and 76 lb-ft of torque from the opposed cylinders.
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On-road handling is one of the BMW's strengths.
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While the Tiger blew through its stroke during off-road riding, the GS handles dirt bumps more easily.
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The Special Edition Rallye model does not come with traction control - something to consider on wet pavement.
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Many AT bikes will never see water crossings, but the GS is one that is willing to get wet and dirty.
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It takes a deliberate action to change gears and there’s not a bumper at either end of the tranny which allows the rider to keep searching up or down for additional gears.
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The BMW’s robust delivery in the bottom-end and midrange makes it more difficult to modulate slides on the dirt.
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Both of our testers ranked the suspension and handling of the GS above the Tiger.
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Both machines carry 5.3 gallons of fuel, but the Beemer is 46 pounds lighter for a total curb weight of 538 pounds.
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Spoked wheels make for better off-road performance and tubeless tires are easy to plug.
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Southern Utah is an adventure touring playground.