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Kendon Modular Trailer Review

Wednesday, December 3, 2003
If storage space is slim in your world  then Kendon may just have the trailer for you!
If storage space is slim in your world, then Kendon may just have the trailer for you!
Space-Savin' Super Hauler

Don't have room for a trailer at your apartment complex? Or perhaps your trusty old rig is gathering rust in the backyard because garage space is at a premium? Kendon's folding, stand-up trailer might be the answer if you can give up a 6.5-foot high, 24-inch deep parking spot for it.

Folding? Stand up? That's right, the tail section folds over and the entire unit can be stood up on the trio of casters built into the rear portion of its powder-coated, triangulated, round-tube steel frame.

We tested Kendon's new-for-2003 and greatly improved, 5x7, modular dual-rail trailer. This latest model sports a lighter, stouter frame and removable (rather than welded-on) bike rails. A larger, lower deck and longer ramp make for easier loading, and beefier casters make it easier to move it around the garage.

Just load  em up  tie  em down and haul. Total carrying capacity of this 350-pound rig is a true ton.
Just load 'em up, tie 'em down and haul. Total carrying capacity of this 350-pound rig is a true ton.
Having used the older model extensively, we most appreciated the Kendon's newfound adaptability. Just remove the eight fasteners on each rail, and voila, instant ATV trailer. In utility mode, it can handle a pair of small, 250cc-sized quads or one larger ATV on its 5-foot by 7-foot diamond-plate platform.

True to its name, this transporter will handle anything this side of a Boss Hoss - dirt bikes, sport bikes, cruisers or quads. Just load 'em up, tie 'em down and haul. Total carrying capacity of this 350-pound rig is a true ton.

As the polished, steel, diamond-plate deck is just a foot off the ground, we had no trouble loading bikes of all sizes. The ramp is secured to the bottom of the trailer's pivoting portion with a pair of wing nuts. Once rolled up the ramp and into the pivoting front-wheel chocks (be sure to check for lower-fairing or chin-spoiler clearances, where applicable), bikes with big-enough front meats stood upright, waiting to be tied in. Bikes were a cinch to cinch down using a combination of the various tie-down points provided. Quads were most easily affixed utilizing the bed's perimeter rail.

Bikes were a cinch to cinch down using a combination of the various tie-down points provided.
Bikes were a cinch to cinch down using a combination of the various tie-down points provided.
The Kendon is a bit wider than a mini-truck, but fits right behind full-sized rigs and is pulled with nary a thought. Instead of a solid axle and leaf springs, this trailer rides on an independent, rubber-cushioned torsion-bar suspension and 13-inch tires. The system not only offers a great ride when fully loaded, but also allows towing just one bike with great stability and road holding without fear of flipping over when turning. The trailer's industry-standard coupler hooks up to a two-inch ball, and the lights are set aglow with a run-of-the-mill four-prong plug - no trailer brakes required.

There were a few areas we believe Kendon can improve upon in its next generation trailer. The trailer's security tether is too short, the ramp is difficult to access, the 350-pound unit is tough to lift up onto its casters and it is still a hassle to push around. Finally, due to the pivoting design, it's also a bit noisy when pulled empty or with mini bikes or quads that don't sit over its folding tail section.

Besides these niggling - but not deal-breaking - ills and its rather steep price ($1,995.95 base price, plus $100 for a spare tire and wheel), Kendon's second-generation big-bike trailer is a well-built, ingenious and space-saving hauling solution.

Check them out online at KendonTrailers.com

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