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Speed and Strength Rage Jeans Review

Thursday, June 20, 2013
Speed   Strength Rage with the Machine Jeans Reveiw
Speed and Strength's Rage with the Machine Jeans are comfy thanks to a relaxed fit and boot cut and come with Kevlar-reinforced knee and seat panels in addition to CE-approved knee armor.
With summer here, sometimes a set of denim riding jeans are more practical than full leathers. While we love the protection of thick leather, black cowhide can be stifling in direct sun, and if a set of denim jeans has Kevlar reinforcement and CE-caliber armor, then we don’t mind sticking a pair in our gear bag. Speed and Strength’s Rage with the Machine Jeans meet these criteria, so we’ve been putting them to the test over the last three-and-a-half months.

Speed and Strength’s Rage Jeans are made of 60% cotton and 40% polyester. On the outside, they look like stylish, everyday denim pants. The cotton/polyester blend is fairly thin, so they breathe well. There’s been no noticeable shrinkage after washing and the color hasn’t faded much. They have stretch panels above the knee so they don’t ride up when you sit down. This keeps an overabundance of wind from rushing up rider’s legs, too. The Rage with the Machine Jeans have a relaxed fit and boot cut so they fit loose and comfy, my personal preference because my legs are fairly thick.

Abrasion protection comes in the form of Kevlar-reinforced panels sewn into the knees and a large section that covers the butt and upper hamstring area. It also includes CE-approved knee armor. Pockets have been sewn into the knee area behind the Kevlar panels to hold the armor in place. The Velcro strip on the CE knee armor is super grabby, so seldom do I get them lined up perfectly on the first try. Once in place, they don’t move around and cover my knee cap well when riding. I pull the knee armor out every time I wash them, which isn’t the most convenient method, but do so as a precautionary measure to preserve the stickiness of the Velcro strip that runs the length of the armor insert.

The 2014 Star Bolt is quick  light and responsive.
Speed and Strength's Rage with the Machine Jeans have stood up to almost four months of testing and look no worse for wear.
The Rage with the Machine Jeans feature two front pockets just over hand-deep. The two rear pockets are about the same depth, but one comes with the added benefit of a small flap that buttons down. Cumulatively, there’s enough storage for the basics I carry, a cell phone, cash, wallet, and pocket knife, with a pocket to spare.

I like to read the reviews posted on our sister site, Motorcycle Superstore, and came across two interesting reports on the Rage with the Machine Jeans stating they had problems with the zipper coming off. I’ve been wearing mine since March, have washed them several times, and haven’t had any problems with the zipper. Inspecting them closely, I could see the potential because there’s only a single line of stitching holding the left side of the zipper in place, but have had no problems with it on my end.

Overall I’ve been pleased with Speed and Strength’s Rage with the Machine Jeans. They look good on and off the bike, are roomy and comfy, light enough for summer rides yet are reinforced in just the right areas. They’ve withstood plenty of use with little signs of wear and are competitively priced at $116.99.

Find Speed and Strength's Rage with the Machine Jeans at the Motorcycle Superstore on sale for $116.99
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Comments
Piglet2010   June 22, 2013 08:41 PM
Nice to have some feedback from people who have crashed in these, to see if they really offer more protection than standard jeans.