Drag site icon to your taskbar to pin site. Learn More

Buell Liquidation Sale Begins Jan 28th

Monday, January 18, 2010
It’s taken some time for the demise of Buell Motorcycles to sink in, but if there’s a final nail in the coffin it’s this: the Buell factory liquidation sale. A press release from the Michigan-based Liquid Asset Partners announced the sale, which begins January 28th at the East Troy, Wisconsin factory.
Buell Liquidation
Left out in the cold... Buell Motorcycles' East Troy factory is headed to liquidation.

Open to the general public, everything’s up for grabs, including the company vans, trailers, handtools and manufacturing equipment. There's even a Triumph Speed Triple and KTM Super Duke that, we assume, the Buell boys used for benchmark comparisons during product development.

Questions abounded since Harley-Davidson dumped the brand. Why not sell Buell, like H-D plans on doing to the recently-acquired MV Agusta? Is the recently formed Erik Buell Racing an attempt to keep the brand on life support until more favorable economic conditions warrant a return?

Now it looks like Buell is one step closer to dead-as-a-doornail dead. Check out the liquidation details in the PR below, courtesy of PR Web. And stay tuned for further developments in the Buell saga, which just does not seem quite finished to us...

Courtesy of PR Web

East Troy, WI - based Buell Motorcycles, a subsidiary of Harley-Davidson, has ceased manufacturing and starts it's liquidation sale this January 28th. Grand Rapids, Michigan - based Liquid Asset Partners will run a liquidation sale for a period of 30 days to maximize the sale of vehicles & factory equipment from the State-of-the-Art facility. The liquidation event will be a historic chance for Motorcycle riders and fans to buy a piece of history and see the inside of the factory for the last time.

Buell Liquidation
The public will be able to place bids on such Buell items as hand tools and manufacturing equipment, as well as the firm's test bike arsenal, including the KTM Super Duke below.
Buell Liquidation
The Buell Motorcycle Company, a subsidiary of Harley-Davidson, has ceased manufacturing motorcycles. On January 28th, 2010 Liquid Asset Partners, a Michigan liquidation firm, will begin the liquidation sale of vehicles and factory equipment from the State-of-the-Art facility. Over the past 26 years Buell has manufactured over 130,000 motorcycles and created avid fans worldwide. The liquidation sale will be a once in a lifetime opportunity for Buell riders and fans to view the inside of the factory and purchase the equipment used to make the high tech sportbikes.

"Buell had a great run as a quality American motorcycle with fans worldwide." says Bill Melvin Jr., CEO of Liquid Asset Partners. "Buell spared no expense in making their beautiful bikes and in purchasing the factory equipment. There is a tremendous interest in the equipment and vehicles left in the factory and there are so many tools nobody will go home empty handed!"

The liquidation sale will start January 28th and run everyday for 30 days until everything is sold. Regardless of cost or loss, millions of dollars worth of equipment and tools will be sold directly on the factory floor. The Liquidation firm will be selling at enormous discounts, right from the start. Customers can buy tools for their garage, computers for their offices, and motorcycle specific equipment for making and testing their bikes.

"This factory was a state of the art, small scale factory. It's the type of facility that many tools and items will be of great interest to the home mechanic and motorcycle fanatic." says Bill Melvin Jr., CEO of Liquid Asset Partners. " To make the sale successful we are prepared to deeply discount the inventory and sell everything in one month! It's stacked high and we're selling it cheap. The public won't want to miss these deals".

The liquidation sale starts January 28th at the Buell Factory at 2815 Buell Dr, East Troy, WI. It is open to the public everyday until everything is sold. Hours of operation are 10am till 7pm Monday thru Saturday and 12noon to 5pm on Sunday. Buyers may view photos and inventory online at
www.LiquidAssetPartners.com.
Buell Dealer Locator

Login or sign up to comment.

Comments
fmaxwell   December 9, 2011 01:36 PM
Over a year has passed and what do we see? Erik Buell is back with Erik Buell Racing and the 1190RS, which won Motorcyclist's Best Dreambike for 2011 and Cycle World's Best Superbike of 2011. Geoff May rode the 1190RS, resetting the lap record four times in one weekend at Homestead-Miami Speedway, as he led the Unlimited Superbike race from start to finish, stretching out the lead the entire time. That's right, he beat pro racers like Cory West and Santiago Villa, mounted on the best that Japan had to offer: Yamaha YZF-R1s, Suzuki GSX-R1000s, Kawasaki ZX-10Rs, and Suzuki GSX-R600s. Red Ninja, you wrote: "And if you think for some reason that a V-Twin engine that produces the same horsepower as an engine with half the displacement, less weight, less flywheel, less vibration, with a lower center of gravity, etc., you have failed to make your case, because I don't see your point. " Then let me simplify it for you: What matters is the area under the torque curve, and the shape of the torque curve, not the calculated peak horsepower at an RPM that is nowhere close to what you ride at. When I'm on my Buell and you're on your i4 600cc bike, let's both roll on the throttle in top gear. You will disappear in my rear-view mirrors. slider-boss, you wrote: "It is too bad that America can't build a motorcycle." Like the 1190RS? See above. What does a 1996 Buell have to do with the bikes that they were making over a decade later? I have a 2006 XB12Ss that I've put a lot of hard miles on. It has been 100% reliable. I'm sorry that your old tube frame Buell had issues, like many from that era, but it really has nothing to do with the bikes that Buell was producing at the time that HD shut them down. In fact, Buell got the go-ahead to produce the XB series because the Buell Blast was the most reliable bike that Harley had ever sold. They had a lower incidence of warranty repairs on that bike than on any bike in HD's line-up.
slider -boss  March 16, 2010 05:14 PM
I bought a new buell S1 lightning in 96....Wasn't worth taking home..wouldn't stop , wouldn't go....just plain ole Harley junk. What made me buy it , Must have been drinking that cheap Harley beer. Traded it for a R1 Yamaha...good bike. I have been riding for 49 years, have owned dozens of bikes of all makes and models including Harleys...currently have 33 ranging from a Yankee to a 2009 cbr Repsol. The Buell without a doubt was the worst motorcycle I ever owned...followed by a 150 suzuki back in the early 60's and rounding out the top three worst would be Harley...Harley didn't kill Buell, Buell killed itself by using Harley engines ....and putting together trash...today Buell is gone, Harley will follow soon, unless the tax payer bails it...It is too bad that America can't build a motorcycle. I have pride in my country too..but not enough to buy the trash that is made here...Harley had its second breath of life and they wasted it on parties and museums and MV......Harley had a chance to build a motorcycle that could compete with the world...but they chose to sell chrome and T-shirts....so good bye to the king of noise.
Red Ninja -Playing with statistics?  January 31, 2010 09:46 AM
Fred M: You comments about the increase in sales may be correct. But Harley's statement clearly states that Buell's success would have no impact on Harley's bottom line (in the near term). In other words, twice nothing is still nothing, and nothing is [not] going to dig Harley out of its hole.
Red Ninja -Buell  January 31, 2010 09:42 AM
Harley killed off Buell just as the brand entered my radar. I met a woman who rides one and raves about it. Fred M.: Every brand has its mechanical innovations, partly to evade patents from other brands, partly because they do have clever, highly-trained engineers who try to optimize their designs. But citing design innovations does not prove the quality or worthiness of a motorcycle or brand. In other words, the whole is more than the sum of its parts. And doing it repeatedly in a sarcastic tone doesn't help your case. So cool it, buddy. Reviews of Buells have been mixed, I would imagine because of the individual biases of the reviewers. This is also true of the Buell's individual parts, such as the brakes, etc. I see no reason why one reviewer's comment should be weighted more than any other's comment, except of course, if it happens to agree with your own. And if you think for some reason that a V-Twin engine that produces the same horsepower as an engine with half the displacement, less weight, less flywheel, less vibration, with a lower center of gravity, etc., you have failed to make your case, because I don't see your point. But you were too busy being sarcastic to explain properly, weren't you?
Red Ninja -Harley Sells Buell Out, Dealers Sell Sport Bikes Out  January 31, 2010 09:20 AM
My wife was taking an MSF class at a Harley Dealership, and while I waited for her class to finish I was chatting with the sales manager. I can tell you that neither he nor his staff were able to pitch any Harley to me. Either they didn't understand or the bikes don't have meaningful specifications in ground clearance, horsepower to weight ratios, quarter-mile times, etc. I was also in the market for a tourer or sport-tourer. Frankly, I wasn't interested in any of the dressers because only one had a frame mounted fairing (more stable) and the big, heavy, air cooled, v-twin engine that shakes like a jack hammer just didn't appeal to me. I ended up buying a GL1800 Gold Wing used for a lot less money. The Harley brand is all based upon image, and when the people who saw Easy Rider all die off, so will the brand. Buell killed off because it was just making Harley look bad. Just as Saturn made GM look bad originally, and was re-absorbed.
Red Ninja -Harley Sells Buell Out, Dealers Sell Sport Bikes Out  January 31, 2010 09:20 AM
My wife was taking an MSF class at a Harley Dealership, and while I waited for her class to finish I was chatting with the sales manager. I can tell you that neither he nor his staff were able to pitch any Harley to me. Either they didn't understand or the bikes don't have meaningful specifications in ground clearance, horsepower to weight ratios, quarter-mile times, etc. I was also in the market for a tourer or sport-tourer. Frankly, I wasn't interested in any of the dressers because only one had a frame mounted fairing (more stable) and the big, heavy, air cooled, v-twin engine that shakes like a jack hammer just didn't appeal to me. I ended up buying a GL1800 Gold Wing used for a lot less money. The Harley brand is all based upon image, and when the people who saw Easy Rider all die off, so will the brand. Buell killed off because it was just making Harley look bad. Just as Saturn made GM look bad originally, and was re-absorbed.
EAB -One more thing...  January 27, 2010 06:43 AM
Anyone that mentions the "exclusivity" of the brand must be drinking a helluva lot more than Kool Aid. Anyone that has read the bike classifieds over the last 4 years will attest that there is nothing exclusive about a cruiser, let alone a Harley.
EAB -Mmmmm  January 27, 2010 05:56 AM
Mike, ask the salespeople if they made any effort to make the potential VROD or Buell rider comfortable in their showroom. Sporbikes and "power cruisers" sell quite well at other brands, but not Harley. Ask this dealership if they ever made an effort to hire a sportbike guy to move their Buell metal. They may not like the folks into such machines, but one thing you can't argue with. My money is just as good as anyone's. All your statement tells me is that they have good product stacked up in some warehouse somewhere because their The Motor Company can't market and cater to folks that would buy such machines. That to me is the definition of irony because HD does a helluva job marketing to the weekend pirates.
milwaukee mike -The V-Rod is next to go  January 27, 2010 05:30 AM
Our local HD dealer mentioned that they have far too many Buells in their inventory as well as two year old V-Rods that the St.Louis Plant is next to be shut down.
But the Sportsters and Big Twins are selling better than predidcted. ZZZZZZTraditional buyers are the core of HDs focus and HOG is considering only memberships to those owners/buyers to increase the exclusitivity of the brand.
Good move HD!
Sumanster -Help rescue Buell  January 22, 2010 01:01 PM
I like Sean's idea over here:
http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/576/5531/Motorcycle-Article/Erik-Buell-Racing-Makes-First-Sales.aspx
Fred M. -Quincy, come join us in the real world...  January 22, 2010 12:18 PM
You wrote: "Fact is boys if Honda or any of the other big four sold sportbikes with 1200cc air cooled twin engines for over $10K they wouldn’t sell very many either." They would if those bikes handled like the Buells. The air-cooled engine on an XB12 series Buell is a much better engine for a street bike than is the I4 600cc engine found on so many Japanese sport bikes. You also ignore the fact that Ducati's wildly popular Monster line is powered by air-cooled twins. So is their Hypermotard line. The SportClassic GT1000 is air-cooled. And every one of those bikes makes less horsepower and less torque than a Buell XB12. And let's not forget Moto Guzzi's numerous air-cooled twins that compete with Buell and Ducati. As to your delusions about the Buell's popularity, the Buell brand grew 55% in the last 5 years, while parent HD grew by just 9% over that same time frame. Now if you prefer a liquid-cooled engine, I have an 1125CR that kicks much butt. ;) EAB and Vince are 100% correct: Buell motorcycles did not break into the big leagues because of where they were sold (Harley Dealers). You might as well try to launch a new line of cruisers that are only sold at Vespa dealers.
EAB -I wouldn't call it disdain  January 22, 2010 07:35 AM
Let's be clear. I have no issue with Harley. I have no issue with Ducati. However, a Ducati dealer (let alone owner) will never dress like a pirate, dismiss the virtues of my ride, or tell me I am less of a man unless I have their product. Remember the commercial Harley put out a few years ago, where one guy gets "blown off" while the other guy, on a Harley, ends up with the girl, and the bra is hanging off of the handlebars in front of a house? Or the guy that says all he ever dreamed about in his life was having a Harley? It's a motorcycle, folks, no less, no more. I guess that's the deal. My bike is a mechanical device. I enjoy it, but it does not define me. And yet I work with completely reasonable, logical, respectable people that, on the weekend, throw on a $500 pirate suit and go ride a $20,000+ motorcycle less than 100 miles, and ignoring every reasonable attempt at safety in the process. Listen, if that's your definition of a good time, have at it. I respect your right to do it, but I sure as hell don't want to be surrounded by that all inclusive mentality when I go shopping for a motorcycle. I have said it before out here, and have been berated for it: I would have a Harley in my stable of motorcycles except for one thing. I don't want to be identified with the pirate culture. I wear bright colored gear and a full faced helmet, I don't want a loud, obnoxious exhaust, and want no implication of my manhood or lifestyle from my bike. I just want to ride. HD doesn't cater to me, as a customer or a motorcyclist. Buell would have been just fine, probably better than fine, if they would have had a competent, independent dealer network. But pirates selling Buells is much like pornstars selling religious salvation. It just was never going to work.
Vince -"I ain't a-goin' in there!"  January 21, 2010 12:47 PM
Read the title. "I ain't a-goin' in there!"... that's what most of 20-something year old sportbike buyers say when they think of H-D dealers. So why would the go in there to buy a Buell? Put a Buell in front one the eyes of a buyer and let an educated and experienced salesman inform the buyer. Test rides help to. I know Buells aren't for everyone, but if you put them in front of eager buyers you'd increase sales because of exposure alone. Once the word gets out that they're not just "fast Harleys", sales would pick up some more. Realistically, the Buell lineup has as much potential to be as big a player in the market as Triumph. The disdain for H-D dealers among the sportbike crowd is what kept Buell from really selling. I have a riding buddy with a 2006 CBR600RR. My 2005 XB12s keeps up just fine as long as we're not going over 100mph. For STREET riding, the Buell is a great machine. The 1125s happen to do well on track to.
EAB -QUINCY???  January 21, 2010 06:11 AM
Quincy? What do you think Ducati sells? Air cooled V twin. I rode a 1200 Buell once. They have more than enough "hit" to get the job done. For those that want more, the 1125 was sitting right beside teh 1200's.
Quincy Abrams -Buell Owners  January 20, 2010 02:36 PM
Fact is boys if Honda or any of the other big four sold sportbikes with 1200cc air cooled twin engines for over $10K they wouldn’t sell very many either. The Buell plant was idling because of poor sales well before they knew they were going to be closed down. Dealers even have 2008 Buells on their sales floor still. The bikes did not sell. Now you can buy a new Buell for $5995 and still dealers can’t get rid of them.

I wouldn’t care to shop in a Harley dealer either but if say HD was selling MV Agusta bikes for half price I would stop in. This does not mean the Buells were bad bikes it just means not enough people wanted them; this happens to a lot of good bikes form all manufacturers. Buell owners will come up with any excuse in the world to justify the “real” reason why the bikes did not sell other than not enough people wanted them. Maybe you guys (Buell owners) do this because you are feeling some cognitive dissonance.
Fred M. -Amen, EAB  January 20, 2010 12:37 PM
Buells were widely praised by those who had actually ridden them and were loudly criticized by blow-hards who had not.

What lead to Buell not becoming one of the big players in the sport bike market was hiding their bikes away in Harley dealerships. Sport bike riders didn't go in Harley dealerships. Harley riders had no interest in buying sport bikes. The dealerships were geared around selling chrome crap, T-shirts, mugs, jackets, and other "lifestyle" merchandise. The motorcycle sales staff generally could not handle any question about any technical aspect of the Buells, had no knowledge about how the Buells compared to the competition, and had no interest in them. Ask a Harley salesman whether a Buell 1125R had more peak horsepower or weighed less than a Triumph Speed Triple and he would have looked at you like a deer staring into headlights.
EAB -The ONLY thing.....  January 20, 2010 11:57 AM
....wrong with the Buell was the dealership they were sold. No one wants to go to a gay bar to look at the opposite sex. No one would go to a Kenworth dealer to look at MINI's. And it's a damn sure bet that no one wants to go to the Harley Pirate Lifestyle dealership to buy a proper sportbike. And forget service. I have a buddy that is a certified HD technician and he bitches at the "rash of changes" that Harley keeps making and how difficult it is to keep up. You want him to try to keep up with the technology curve on a sportbike?? It weren't the bikes, folks. I think the deal was HD knew they couldn't sell Buell out of their shops successfully. More than that, they knew if they sold it to ANY OTHER manufacturer IE Victory, they WOULD be able to sell the product successfully as there is no judgment or ego when the customer shops there. Really, do you think I would feel like a respected customer riding my Honda 600 to the local Harley Dealership to try to talk sport bikes to some tatted up pirate that thinks high performance is a chrome air cleaner? Figure in the posers that ride in from "blocks away" to show off their latest chrome trinket. H**l, I don't even go to the local bike night because I can't stand the stench, I sure as hell won't go to an HD dealership, even if Christ himself designed the bike. RIP Buell, you will be missed.
Fred M. -Correction.  January 20, 2010 08:41 AM
I left in a sentence fragment that I intended to edit out:

'That was despite the'

Sorry for any confusion.

Fred M. -Manhattan Rider  January 20, 2010 08:40 AM
You wrote:

"It all comes back to Buell going out of business because they failed to make products consumers wanted to buy."

Absolutely untrue. In the last 5 years, Buell grew by 55% while Harley grew by 9%. That was despite the

"Buell never made a profit for Harley-Davidson"

Please provide any substantiation for that -- since even HD's board of directors were unable to untangle the books (HD and Buell were not separately accounted for) to determine if Buell was profitable.

"I stopped at Frontier Harley Davidson. This dealer was selling Buell Blasts for $1900 each, and couldn't find buyers."

What a surprise! A bottom of the line beginner bike from a sport bike company doesn't sell to people who like to dress up like pirates and ride chromed cruisers on the weekend. If the Buells had been sold next to Aprilia, Ducati, Moto Guzzi, BMW, and the like, they would have had the exposure that they never while they were sequestered in Harley dealerships.

"So what does a dealer do with Buell that don't sell...see link. http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthread.php?t=41941"

Those were the test mules that were used at Buell for R&D. Next time do a little research and look a lot less silly.
Manhattan Rider -motorcyclist  January 20, 2010 05:06 AM
It all comes back to Buell going out of business because they failed to make products consumers wanted to buy. Buell never made a profit for Harley-Davidson; a company that dominates close to 50% of the US market. While passing through Lincoln Nebraska this past weekend, I stopped at Frontier Harley Davidson. This dealer was selling Buell Blasts for $1900 each, and couldn't find buyers. So what does a dealer do with Buell that don't sell...see link. http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthread.php?t=41941
Rob Latimer -Lifestyle  January 19, 2010 07:30 PM
I am submitting this respectfully.

Harley-Davidson is selling a lifestyle. You don't know how many toothless hillbillies that wave and give me the "thumbs-up" when they see me on my lowered fancy painted Sportster.

The trouble is, I rarely if ever ride it anymore, I rode a Blast for most of one year while the Sportster sat in the garage...all year! I now ride the Ulysses where ever I go, why? Is it cool looking? Yes! Does it handle like nothing else? Yes! Does it have a stronger motor than 99% of the Harely-Davidson Screaming Eagle hopped up lard tugs? Yes!

What I am trying to say is EVERYBODY has a Harley-Davidson Hat, mug, tee shirt, most of them don't even own a Harley-Davidson motorcycle, they just want to be a part of the lifestyle. They are everything from 100 years ago, The Wild Bunch, Wild Hogs, but there is no future. For the Harley-Davidson motorcycle company to say they are re-focusing on their core market is like a super food store saying they are going to focus only on selling chicken. Either way it is a HUGE wasted resource, and a very sad commentary on the Harley-Davidson motorcycle company.

I am all done with Harley-Davidson, I have out grown their products and will seek other means to move me, after of course I have exhausted all available Buell Motorcycles. Hopefully by that time the rest of the motorcycle manufactures will have brought their product up to the level of engineering that Buell Motorcycles are now.

Heaven help us all.
Fred M. -Gershin, you're not keeping up...  January 19, 2010 07:03 PM
"Thanks Fred for supporting my statement with a quote right from the horse’s mouth." You mean where Erik Buell said it was a Buell engine? Buell and Rotax collaborated on the design with five of Buell's engineers working full-time on the design for 3.5 years. "I do huh…" Yes, you do. Do you have any idea how inconsequential the parts count you named is in the overall scheme of a motorcycle? You also show how superficial your knowledge of engines is. You don't consider the balance shafts in the Buell, the gears that drive them, or the bearings they ride in. You don't consider that having double the cams means that the Buell also has two cam-drive chains, two cam drive chain tensioner assemblies, and four gears in addition to the four cam-drive sprockets. You don't mention that it has two cylinder assemblies, two head assemblies, two valve cover assemblies, and all of the associated gaskets on each. I too, could go on, but facts don't seem to sway your opinion much. "A bit more weight than whom, all the other pros who gave their opinion on the other bikes? I wasn’t referring to buddies of mine." No, you were referring to authors of articles in motorcycle magazines -- and Jeremy McWilliams trumps them. "Looked like to me the Buell was being out handled by DMG spec 600cc bikes that’s a far cry form WSBK" I can't believe that Buell hired some hack like Jeremy McWilliams as a test rider when you could have just watched someone else ride them around the track. Of course, Motorcycle USA said that the Buell outhandled the Kawasaki and the Aprilia when they compared the three DSB bikes.
Court Canfield -Confusing Decisions  January 19, 2010 06:08 PM
I suspect that Friday, when Harley-Davidson releases 4th quarter earnings, it will be interesting. One month they proudly announce they are breaking ground and building the new "Buell World HQ". The next announcement was the Buell was being canned. This on the heels of Buell growing 55% over the past 5 years while Harley-Davidson grew 9%. Well. . . they now have their eggs in India (they actually traded Mangos to cut the deal. . no kidding, read about it) selling $75,000 700# bikes to folks who's average weight is like 125%. This happens just as we get a new CEO and new CFO, both of whom have never ridden a motorcycle. (In fairness, Wandell has bought one and is learning). When I grow up I want to be a genius too.
Vanson1200R -MIA  January 19, 2010 05:58 PM
I bought an “American” car that was made in Mexico but it says Ford on the deck lid. I bought an “American” bike though many of its parts were made elsewhere. I know that my American machinery may not be as good as other machinery but my Buell is unique and distinctive and does what I need it to do. My XB has been in production for a number of years and still most Americans have no idea what it is and I love that and hate it at the same time. I believe if Buells were sold alongside KTM, Triumph, Ducati, Moto Guzzi or heck even Urals for that matter they would of fared better. What person goes into a Harley dealer to look for a sportbike? Very few. I am saddened and angry at the decision to kill an American company when so few of them exist and to take away the choice of something different for those of us who do not walk the beaten path. For this reason I cannot support the American company called Harley Davidson. If I choose to buy a bike in that class I will buy a Victory. Hehe, Victory. The name says it all! You hear that Harley?
Gershwin -Fred M  January 19, 2010 05:20 PM
“it was built for us by Rotax but this is completely our own engine built to our specification, it’s a clean design, not something that existed at all”. My own words: “I would squarely rest this credit on the shoulders of Rotax, the people who actually built the motor, not Buell”. Thanks Fred for supporting my statement with a quote right from the horse’s mouth. “I'm sure that you had no idea that Buell's engineers worked with Rotax using FEA (Finite Element Analysis) models -- since the engine an integral part of the chassis, the engine stiffness needed to be included in the models to get the ideal chassis stiffness”. I’m sure you realize this is nothing new because other manufacturers have used the chassis as a stress member before and FEA is used even by after market suppliers like JE pistons. “Buell does not have half as many parts. They have 2/3 as many parts (when I debate, I do so honestly). But you grossly overestimate the engine part count effect”. I do huh…16 valves, valve guides, valve springs (32 if double springs) vs. 8 of each, 4 pistons, sets of piston rings, connecting rods, rod bolts, wrist pins etc. vs. 2 of each, 4 throttle bodies vs. 2 I could go on. “The personal opinion of someone like ex-MotoGP rider Jeremy McWilliams carries a bit more weight”. A bit more weight than whom, all the other pros who gave their opinion on the other bikes? I wasn’t referring to buddies of mine. “He said that the chassis and suspension of the stock 1125R was good enough to race World Superbike” Looked like to me the Buell was being out handled by DMG spec 600cc bikes that’s a far cry form WSBK. I also respect engineering accomplishments that is one of the reasons why I like motorcycles and Buell had some good bikes but they were not as good or advanced as the marketed reputation that preceded them.
kpaul -You nailed it Tim B  January 19, 2010 04:26 PM
Harley's customer base is old and getting older with every hip replacement. Buell was Harley's future but they threw the baby our with the bath water. This short sighted decision will bite them in butt. wait and see.
Tim B -Harley Sucks  January 19, 2010 04:04 PM
I own a 2007 Buell XB12Scg. It is my first motorcycle. I bought it as a college graduation gift to myself. I chose it because of the styling, the low seat height, and because it was different. Being a mechanical engineer myself, I liked the unique engineering features. Erik Buell is a genius. If you look at how many manufacturers are following some of his ideas that will give you a hint of his ingenuity.

I have to say I've had lots of problems with it all along the way all from the Harley slug of an engine. If Harley would have let Erik develop his own engine we would have an amazing hooligan bike. But Harley tied his hands, bought him out, and crapped on him by closing Buell. They should have at least sold it off.

What the Harley execs don't get is that the Harley fad has died down significantly. They're not going to have good sales in the near future for two reasons. The yuppies who aren't real, lifelong motorcyclists bought these bikes and lots of these people grew scared or bored with the Harleys. Do you think they're going to buy another one in the future? I highly doubt it. Plus, Harley's target audience is old and getting even older. Most young people don't want Harleys, but a lot of young people did want Buells, especially if they would have increased their performance. So by killing Buell I think they're losing a lot of potential young customers. I would be very happy if the death of Buell helps kill Harley.
Fred M. -Competition...  January 19, 2010 03:10 PM
Manhattan Rider wrote "If Buell's technology was as good as Fred M. think it was, why not compete on the world stage against liter class superbikes?" I'm going to cheat here by citing actual facts in this debate: In its debut in a Superbike race (June of 2008), the Buell 1125R captured third place despite having been delivered to the team just a week earlier, running on a DOT rear tire rather than a slick (due to rim width), and using a stock engine. In its first time racing in Germany (at Hockenheim) the only two Buell 1125R bikes the 32 bike lineup placed 2nd and 5th. That was in a field with Ducatis and Aprilias plus four BMW HP2 Sports and five KTM RC 8s. But the 1125R was designed to be a damned good street bike, not a race bike. That's the difference between Buell and many other manufacturers: Buell's bikes are built to work best on the street, but they also perform well on a track. Many other manufacturers create bikes the win races and then add lights to them, resulting in bikes that are a PITA on the street. In fact, when the engine for the 1125R was designed, there was no 1200cc allowance for twins and it just was not part of Erik Buell's equation. The Ducati 1198 is not "far superior." I've been on them. They are damned uncomfortable and unpleasant to ride on a public road. The riding position is totally wrong ergonomically as it's designed for track speeds. If I were trying to win a race, I'd buy the Ducati -- but not to ride on the street.
Fred M. -Gershwin... What can I say?  January 19, 2010 02:44 PM
Gershwin I wrote: “The frames of the 1125R and 1125CR bikes were darned close to being as light as MotoGP frames”. You responded: "Care to back up this statement with something other than your opinion?" One source is the book "25 Years of Buell" by Court Canfield and Dave Gess. I am at work and don't have access to the motorcycle magazine in which the statements about chassis weight for the 1125R vs. MotoGP were made. "I would squarely rest this credit on the shoulders of Rotax, the people who actually built the motor, not Buell." From a Kneeslider.com interview: Erik Buell: "Well this is really a Buell engine not a Rotax, it was built for us by Rotax but this is completely our own engine built to our specification, it’s a clean design, not something that existed at all. Other than maybe the oil filter or something like that, this is totally new, it’s not used anywhere else." I'm sure that you had no idea that Buell's engineers worked with Rotax using FEA (Finite Element Analysis) models -- since the engine an integral part of the chassis, the engine stiffness needed to be included in the models to get the ideal chassis stiffness. You probably also didn't know that the early EFI problems were largely solved by Buell, rather than Rotax, engineers. You replied: Well that’s really easy to do when the equivalent Japanese bike has twice as many cylinders and therefore twice as many valves and so on. I need to make a correction: Buell does not have half as many parts. They have 2/3 as many parts (when I debate, I do so honestly). But you grossly overestimate the engine part count effect. Buells have the same number of gears (6). They have twice as many cams (4 vs 2 in an I4). The differences are due to Buell's innovative engineering. For example, Japanese bikes need two brake rotors on the front wheel compared to the Buell's single rotor. That doubles the number of calipers, caliper mounting bolts, etc. It triples the number of brake lines. In the back, Buell cast the brake caliper mount into the swingarm, eliminating the bracket and bolts that hold it in place. The Buell belt drive requires no adjustment, eliminating the mechanism to move the rear wheel to adjust slack. I could go on, but it's clear that your mind is already made up when you are so quick to dismiss the engineering talents of the Buell team. "I’ve read countless articles that declared the CBR600RR was the best handling bike ever or the R6, GSXR the list goes on and on. It’s just one guy’s personal opinion not gospel etched in a stone tablet." The personal opinion of someone like ex-MotoGP rider Jeremy McWilliams carries a bit more weight. He said that the chassis and suspension of the stock 1125R was good enough to race World Superbike -- all that was needed was more power to be competitive. "The fact you think Buell had incredible engineering talent is a reflection on how well Buell’s marketing worked on you." No, it's a reflection of the fact that I am an engineer and I recognize and respect engineering talent when I see it. It's also a reflection on my experience with motorcycles, having owned well over a dozen of them, including ones from each of the Japanese big-4, Hodaka, Penton, Buell, and Aprilia.
Manhattan Rider -motorcyclist  January 19, 2010 12:40 PM
I Buell's technology was as good as Fred M. think it was, why not compete on the world stage against liter class superbikes. The facts are Buell, even with the Rotax AUSTRIAN motor, was only capable of competing against 600cc motorcycles. I would agree that Buell had some innovative ideas. However, the heart of every motorcycle is the motor. Although the Rotax was a giant step forward, it negated the original idea in the first place of building an American made sport bike. For the same money, why not buy a far superior European sportbike like the new Ducati 1198? Ultimately, the consumer voted and Buell is history.
cdunc -Awesome  January 19, 2010 12:12 PM
There costumers set the bar low. Most of the posers didn't know anything about Buell. Remember when the V-Rod came out, those jack asses called it "not a real Harley". Harley Davidson=Retards, Buell=Fail, costumers=Aarrrr!
Derrick -Buell.  January 19, 2010 11:40 AM
Ok well I don't know what the big deal with Buell is but I've never really felt anything for them or their bikes. lol. I've just always viewed their products as a notch below the Japanese and Europeans. Even though he came out with stuff like fuel in frame, their trick brake system, etc...I think what I'm trying to say is that for example there isn't a wow factor for me with Buell as say...with Ducati or something. But I ride a Kawasaki so hahaha.
Bob -Here's What's Sad  January 19, 2010 11:16 AM
Buell was actually making a profit. The problem was that the profit wasn't big enough. HD wants their profit margins to be "X" but Buells were bringing in less than "X". They were self sustaining and not sucking on HD's teat for money. They had their own. I don't have a B.A. but who needs one to know that any profit is a good thing since it allows your doors to stay open and keeps people in their jobs. Their accounting logic defies me...
Gershwin -Fred M  January 19, 2010 11:09 AM
“The frames of the 1125R and 1125CR bikes were darned close to being as light as MotoGP frames”. Care to back up this statement with something other than your opinion? “Their 1125 series motors are capable of 175rwhp and, when bumped up to 1190cc, they are hitting 190 rwhp”. I would squarely rest this credit on the shoulders of Rotax, the people who actually built the motor, not Buell. “They managed to build a bike with about half as many parts as the equivalent Japanese bike”. Well that’s really easy to do when the equivalent Japanese bike has twice as many cylinders and therefore twice as many valves and so on. “The handling of the Buells was incredible, leading one respected Euro magazine to crown an XB series Buell the best cornering production bike”. I’ve read countless articles that declared the CBR600RR was the best handling bike ever or the R6, GSXR the list goes on and on. It’s just one guy’s personal opinion not gospel etched in a stone tablet. “The fact that you failed to recognize Buell's incredible engineering talent is a sad reflection on HD's marketing, not on Buell”. The fact you think Buell had incredible engineering talent is a reflection on how well Buell’s marketing worked on you.
karl -tool boxes.  January 19, 2010 10:28 AM
i bet those boxes are probably property of assembly line techs who were shut out(locked out)from their work place.and low and behold, the thief of the corporation has in their mind to get rid of these items before the employee's can get a legal order for their return. you go harley- davidson!
Vince -HD = Fail  January 19, 2010 07:57 AM
The fact that HD did nothing to glean anything from Buell's technological strides is embarassing. HD won't be building Buell designed sportbikes in house. The very fact that they're liquidating the factory says that they've washed their hands of the market segment completely. It's a shame. A real effort at marketing the brand would have yielded better sales. Ponder this: how many 20-something adult males, who are sportbike owners/buyers, would ever set foot into a HD dealer to shop? That's why Buell sales were low. They were very good bikes, even with the meddling hand of Willie G. thwarting several tech advances that Erik Buell would have otherwise rolled out to the buyer.
Robert -It's a shame  January 19, 2010 07:38 AM
Sorry to see Buell go. I just got back into motorcycles so I don't know much about them. But what I've heard was so positive.
Now will HD be next? I like HD. Enjoy their bikes even though I ride a Vstrom. But I don't understand a lot of their decisions. They build bikes that traditionalists love, but younger folks who appreciate technology have nothing to love there. What about doing something interesting with the Vrod motor?
Fred M. -Buell WAS ALL ABOUT Technology  January 19, 2010 07:30 AM
Manhattan Rider wrote "Buell never had the technology to compete with liter class sport bike"

Are you serious? Buell was so far ahead of the others technology-wise that is was astounding. They had fuel carried in the frame and underslung exhaust for mass centralization. They had their ZTL brakes to minimize unsprung mass. The frames of the 1125R and 1125CR bikes were darned close to being as light as MotoGP frames. They managed to build a bike with about half as many parts as the equivalent Japanese bike. The handling of the Buells was incredible, leading one respected Euro magazine to crown an XB series Buell the best cornering production bike.

Their 1125 series motors are capable of 175rwhp and, when bumped up to 1190cc, they are hitting 190 rwhp.

The fact that you failed to recognize Buell's incredible engineering talent is a sad reflection on HD's marketing, not on Buell.
EricH -Shame on Harley Davidson.  January 19, 2010 06:36 AM
I guess the suits at the 'Marketing Company' fail to realize that they are killing a product that is not even in their own market segment.
Manhattan Rider -motorcyclist  January 19, 2010 05:46 AM
Buell never had the technology to compete with liter class sport bike and was never accepted by the HD crowd. Buell riders were too small of a niche marketing to ever be profitable. American motorcycle companies can still profit if they provide bike riders want to buy. HD over marketed their products to costume party weekend bikers and not real motorcyclists. Victory on the other hand is doing quite well marketing to folks that simply like great motorcycles.
BeeBop -Dollars & No Sense  January 19, 2010 04:51 AM
BUELL was so ahead of the game (HD is still using "Sticky Notes").. Now that the Baby Boomers are selling thier Sled Kings for a grave sit and a head stone HD will die with that generation. The younger Free Thinking/Helmet Wearing generation will be wanting performance, technology and the best bang for the buck. BMW and HONDA will be the riders edge. Think about this>> Who want to be a ROAD CAPTAIN of a HOG Chapter that parades taveren to taveren?
Sammy -Final countdown for HD  January 19, 2010 03:53 AM
I wounder if the HD executives ever heard the phrase, "Putting all your eggs in one basket."? I'm not a big cruiser bike fan but surely they have a place in "our world", BUT so do sport bikes, dirt bikes, sport touring bikes or anything else for that matter. My point is, is that HD has spent 100% of their efforts marketing their bikes to one type and eventually that style or fade is going to change, just as it has done many times before! Knock knock Harley...Do you guys recall that time in the 70's when you damn near went tits up? Well as your numbers continue to fall sooner or later you'll be wishing you still owned that little company named Buell! I'll hate to see that happen but the fact remains that history ALWAYS repeats itself and there is no changing that fact! Obviously all the HD exec's must have been too high to remember those times...
Old Rider -Old rider  January 19, 2010 02:04 AM
HD loyalty…fading everywhere. HD chased the bucks and got so goofy over the past 10yrs. What next their own coffee brand or toothpaste? Trying way to hard to be cool, when we all know cool is the individual and the bikes we ride, not the label or brand. HD tried to highjack the simplicity of bikes, coolness and Americana. The article talks about nails in the coffin for Buell... we'll how about screws rusting and starting to fail within HD. Yes, this story and saga will go on... until another American Company shuts it's doors... because of creed and stupidity. Viva Japan!
Cowboy -Sad  January 18, 2010 10:33 PM
Pretty sad commentary on American industry and the economy in general....
Deltablues -What If?  January 18, 2010 07:19 PM
So, what if Buell really is not dead? What if Buells are going to be made in-house and called Harley's instead? Do any of you remember that strange ad campaign a few months before Buell was killed off...the ad where they crushed the bikes?
irksome -!!!  January 18, 2010 06:35 PM
Just wanted to take another opportunity to bash The Marketing Company for killing off the last Great American Motorcycle Company. One can only hope that as HD's core of pirate wanna-be riders age gracelessly and buy motorhomes, their executives will awaken in the middle of the night sitting bolt upright, bathed in sweat hollering "Wait! We could have learned from Buell!"
Malibu Mary -Harley is next?  January 18, 2010 06:33 PM
I wonder if or when Harley gets liquidated which bikes we will see as their test mules. They would probably be Royal Enfields or something because anything more modern would have left them confused and frustrated. Set the bar low and you can accomplish almost anything and for those around you who set and achieve higher goals call them un-American and sissies. I don’t want to see either one of these companies go out of business but if Buell survived and not Harley I would be less disappointed.