Drag site icon to your taskbar to pin site. Learn More

Heed 505

2010 Aprilia RSV4R Review

Tuesday, October 27, 2009
First Look - Aprilia RSV4R
The RSV4R's V-Four engine has some serious steam in terms of bottom-end and mid-range power.
Hey guys, it’s your boy Adam here. I just got done spinning exactly 16 laps in Valentino Rossi’s backyard at Mugello aboard the 2010 Aprilia RSV4R sportbike. And it is absolutely incredible!
 
The first thing that really stands out is its V-Four engine. It’s amazing how stout its bottom and mid-range power is. Wack the throttle and the thing takes off building revs instantly with the kind of voracity of a 600cc Inline-Four, but the outright power of a 1000. All the while the engine is wailing like its ready to explode. The engine and exhaust note sound so, so close to Ducati’s Desmosedici—it’s insane. I’d dole out its 16 grand asking price based on the sounds alone.Top-end power however, isn’t as exciting as the engine feels like it stops making power shy of its 14,100 rpm rev ceiling. Don’t worry though, as all it takes is a simple upshift and you’re right back in that fat mid-range where the engine performs best.

In the flesh, the RSV4R is definitely a petite motorcycle. It’s the most compact liter-class sportbike on the market, smaller than even Honda’s diminutive CBR1000RR. Yet it literally fits like it was tailor made for my six-foot frame. Mugello’s got multiple straight-aways and it’s here that I really dig the ergos and its streamlined aerodynamics. When I scoot my butt all the way to the back of the seat and tuck my chin inside the fuel tanks cleverly designed cut-out there is absolutely zero wind buffet plus I can see exactly where I’m going at upwards of 290 KPH.
 
While it’s indisputable how tiny of a machine the RSV4R is, surprisingly enough, getting the bike to change direction is way more work than I assumed. This bike requires significant body input to get it pointed. Once it starts turning it drops into the corner predictably all the way to full lean. Even better is the phenomenal amount of feel when it’s on the edge of the tire. Aprilia sportbike chassis typically have a very rigid feel to them so I was surprised that the RSV4R’s did move around a bit. It’s not necessarily a bad thing and we look forward to getting more than 16-laps so we can play with the suspension settings, etc. 
2010 Aprilia RSV4R
MotoUSA was one of two U.S. magazines invited to Mugello to test the 2010 Aprilia RSV4R.

 
It’s also impressive how Aprilia’s latest generation ride-by-wire engine management system works. The rear tire-to-throttle connection is out of this world giving the rider confidence to light up the rear tire pretty much on demand—good times.

Overall, I’m really, really impressed with the RSV4R. It’s hard to say if it’s any faster or performs better than the current 1000cc class leader, but there is no question that it raises the bar in terms of sheer exhilaration and thrill factor. That’s all from Mugello. We’ll have comprised the in-depth ride report come Monday. Ciao!

*Editors Note: Read Waheed's full-review in the 2010 Aprilia RSV4R First Ride.
Post Tags: 2010 Aprilia RSV4R Review, 2010 aprilia rsv4r, 2010 aprilia rsv4, aprilia rsv4, rsv4r, rsv4
Follow on Google Plus Follow Adam Waheed on Google+
Blog Archive
2014
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2013
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
2008
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Login or sign up to comment.