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Heed 505

Crash. Bang. Boom.

Monday, January 12, 2009
“Motorcycling’s dangerous.” I hear it all the time. Everyone from the check-out girl when I’m a helmet-donned customer at the grocery store, to the gas station cashier when I tell him I need $50 on pump 2… "And hurry it up, 'cause I’ve got motocross practice to catch at 9:00 a.m. sharp." But what the majority of non-motorcyclists don’t know is that when you wear the right gear, ride within your limits, and keep your wits about you, motorcycling can actually be safe. Yet if one of those elements is missing, you can be sure motorcycling’s most assumed outcome i.e. danger is near.
 
For me, it struck on my regularly scheduled Sunday night riding session at Starwest Motocross Park. If you’ve never ridden there, it’s a great local Southern Californian spot to put in some laps seven days of the week. Plus flood lights allow the fun to last until the wee hours of the evening. Problem was, on that night, I just wasn’t it feeling it. Maybe it’s because I’m tired of lapping on under-sprung 250Fs, or maybe it’s because I’ve become burned-out—having ridden some type of motorcycle everyday for the greater part of six months (I know, poor me)… Hell, maybe it was the cold 40-some degree weather? Whatever the case, the warning signs were all there and I was close to just packing it up and calling it a day, but I just wouldn’t and by doing so I lost focus on the most imporant task at hand—riding.
 
I awoke to a bunch of strange faces kneeling over me. My body was pinging with pain from everywhere. I glance to my right and notice that my arm has an unusual horseshoe shape. The paramedics arrive in what seemed like a flash and I’m enroute to the hospital thoroughly banged up.
 
Since, a riding acquaintance and now friend, Chris Cole gave me the play-by-play on what happened. I crashed on an easy 60-foot double that I’d never give a second thought to. It’s that easy. So the only possible explanation for my accident was that I’d lost concentration, forcing a mistake.

Seven days later, I’m still busted up—bones creaking and back aching. But I’m thankful for my VFX-W helmet, Leatt neck brace and trusty ol’ Astars Tech 10 shoes, which surely helped prevent additional injury. As I prepare to return back to the nine-to-five on Monday I ask myself, ‘so what have I learned from this?’ And the answer is as clear: Quit when the signs are there and even most importantly—always keep 100-percent concentration while riding or else you might be aching a lot like me.
Post Tags: motocross, starwest, 250f, vfx-w, leatt
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Comments
Haroon -Crash. Bang. Boom. January 22, 2009 05:46 PM
I'm glad you learned an important lesson. Always stay focused when you are up for it.
Linda -Yeah, I hate that whole assumption about danger, too January 12, 2009 11:42 AM
Hope you heal up soon. I do hate the people who refer to be as an "organ donor." I always call them on it. I've had a spill here or there, mostly when I lost respect for what I was doing or lost focus. Serious accidents are just not a "given." Best wishes, Linda http://www.ravensrides.com http://www.markeroni.com