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Heed 505

John Hopkins on MotoGP Versus Superbike

Wednesday, August 4, 2010
Our friends at On The Throttle TV speak with former MotoGP rider John Hopkins about the differences between MotoGP and Superbike motorcycles. Hopkins spent a good number of years racing all types of motorcycles from production Supersport and Superbikes to 500cc and MotoGP prototypes. Now he’s transitioned back into Superbikes and is back home in the U.S. competing with the M4 Monster Energy Suzuki team in the American Superbike class. Currently he is recovering from a major reconstructive wrist surgery and it hasn’t yet confirmed when he’ll be back racing. Check it out:

Post Tags: John Hopkins talks MotoGP Versus Superbike
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Comments
Big Ron -Re: TG - Electronics August 4, 2010 11:46 AM
I dont know man, I hear what you are saying but I have read alot of interviews lately in which some of the veteran riders are looking forward to the liter bikes and the reduction of electronics. I am refering to Rossi, Haden, Edwards and Spies (the rookie). There senitments are similiar to Hoppers. I can say this much; I was at Laguna Seca and the superbike race was much more entertaining. It was an actual race with the top guys battling out for the lead. The GP race was more like a race against the clock as the riders were just waiting for the guy infront of them to make a mistake as opposed to fighting it out. The only passing I recall seeing was Rossi passed Divizioso, Lorenzo passed Stoner and Spies passed Hayden. Other than that it was kind of boring.
TG -Borderling Digs August 4, 2010 09:32 AM
He's almost talking down the rider level in GP "there is no throttle control on the GP bikes, you're either 100% throttle or off." There may be some truth to that with the new electronics, but the guy on top of the bike still has to move the bike where it needs to go. I like Hopper, and like to root for the Americans overseas; but, if it were that easy, why didn't he succeed? Blame it on the bike/team. That's real big of him (and a quick way to tell the difference between people learning/growing and ones on the way out).