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BMW S1000RR Breaks Cover in America

Monday, June 8, 2009
The brake system on the new S 1000 RR lives up to the high standard of performance on the drivetrain and suspension in every respect. Here again  therefore  the development specialists at BMW Motorrad have given utmost attention to meeting all the demands and wishes of the most discerning supersports customers.
BMW finally allows us to take a look at the 2010 BMW S1000RR in person and reveals some details on the US price.
The recent Miller Motorsports Park round of World Superbike races marked the unveiling of BMW’s new 2010 S1000RR sportbike to the US market. And while the talk and buzz surrounding the actual machine and all it has to offer was high, no doubt piquing everyone’s interest was their loose pricing claims. But not in a typical BMW-high way. Quite the opposite.

“We will be within $1000 of the competition,” said Pieter de Waal, VP of BMW Motorrad USA. And by competition, he refers not to the exotic Ducati and Aprilia sportbikes you may think, but the run-of-the-mill Japanese 1000cc sportbikes; the affordable bikes of the bunch. Which, depending on where their prices fall for 2010, should have the base S1000RR coming into American for roughly $14,000. Which, for a BMW packed full of high-tech engineering (even in base from), this seems almost unbelievable. Though considering they are aiming for nearly 90% of sales to be conquest sales from the Japanese makers, this would make sense.

How they will do it and still make a profit? Now, that will be the tough part. And an important part at that. According to De Waal the success of the entire BMW Motorrad division rests in some part on the success of the S1000RR. Talk about pressure.

After four years in the making, we had a chance to get a close-up look at the new Beemer in the flesh at MMP to see what all one gets for supposedly “under $14,000.”

Technical Features

Titanium valves  both intake and exhaust  are actuated by equally small and light single cam followers. Valve play is compensated by means of adjustment platelets running on the spring plates.
Titanium valves, both intake and exhaust, are actuated by equally small and light single cam followers. Valve play is compensated by means of adjustment platelets running on the spring plates.
“For us the key is to come to market with a product that will out-perform the competition in your (magazine and website) shootouts, as this is what the consumer basis a lot of their buying decisions on,” continued De Waal. “Most people will not go to the track and may not be able to push a bike like this to 99% of its limits, so it is important to us to set the fastest lap times and make the most horsepower in your comparisons as this show the buyers which bike is most capable.”

Starting with the engine, BMW is claiming a strong 193 horsepower at the crank, putting it right in the mix, or even at the upper end of the liter-class competition. Not to mention they claim a whopping rev-ceiling of 14,200rpm, well over that of the competition. Bore and stroke comes in at a very oversquare 80mm x 49.7mm, making for a displacement of 999cc. In fact, at 80mm it’s the biggest bore in the literbike segment. But much of the BMW S1000RR engine’s capability is the result of their Formula-1 derived valvetrain system.
Exiting spent gasses is a uniquely-designed 4-2-1 exhaust system  featuring a host of race technology mixed in with the emissions requirements designed to meet government regulations while still providing as much usable power as possible.
Exiting spent gasses is a uniquely-designed exhaust system, featuring a host of race technology mixed in with the emissions requirements.

Titanium valves, both intake and exhaust, are actuated by equally small and light single cam followers. Valve play is compensated by means of adjustment platelets running on the spring plates. On the intake side the spring plates are made of light aluminum-fiber material. Combined with a small sprocket driving each cam via an intermediate gear and lightweight cam followers, it allows higher revving of the engine with equal reliability.

Another design highlight of the cylinder head is the arrangement of the cam follower axes, as both the intake and the exhaust followers are facing to the rear in the direction of travel. This keeps the cylinder head slimmer. All told this also means the engine weighs a feather light 132 lbs.

Exiting spent gasses is a uniquely-designed 4-2-1 exhaust system, featuring a host of race technology mixed in with the emissions requirements designed to meet government regulations while still providing as much usable power as possible. It uses a short rear end muffler, pre-silencer and electronically controlled interference pipe flaps, as well as a fully controlled exhaust gas manifold and two fully controlled three-way catalytic converters.

Active safety when braking is signifi cantly enhanced by Race ABS developed especially for the S 1000 RR as a genuine supersports and available as an option straight from the factory.
Active safety when braking is significantly enhanced by Race ABS developed especially for the S1000RR as a genuine supersports and available as an option straight from the factory.
Slowing things is an available race-capable ABS braking system. While still keeping the machine’s weight at a claimed 450 lbs, BMW claims it is the lightest supersport 1000 with ABS, and they developed the system almost entirely on the racetrack, to aid in track prowess instead of take away from it. Part of the optional add-ons is the DTC (Dynamic Traction Control) system, which features settings from Rain to Sport to Racetrack and Racetrack Slicks. Included in the system are wheel-speed sensors that provide the rider a host of TC (Traction Control) options at the flick of a switch. While unconventional as to how it’s displayed, we can’t wait to try the systems. BMW has it down to a science on the M-series high-performance sports cars, so it will be extremely interesting to see how it works on their first true supersport motorcycle.

As a stressed-member of the aluminum frame, the engine sits a 32% angle for claimed optimum weight distribution, while suspension up front is the latest in inverted fork fare, sitting 46mm in diameter. Out back a fully-adjustable race-bred shock controls a “very torsionally-stiff” box-type aluminum swingarm.

Supreme aerodynamics and sporting ergonomics ideal for both the tall and short rider.
Supreme aerodynamics and sporting ergonomics ideal for both the tall and short rider.
Further keeping weight down is an aluminum gas tank, something not regularly seen in this market due to cost. Gauges feature an almost overwhelming amount of information, traditional BMW-style, though we would venture to guess once used to the interface they would come in quite handy. Rounding out the new machine is revolutionary-styled bodywork. Showcasing an asymmetrical design with one side of the fairing slightly different than the other and two different headlights up front, the angular skins have been much talked about since the bike first broke cover.

“For us we needed to come up with something different,” De Waal said of the design. “If we make a Japanese lookalike then people would quickly criticize and with it being different people may not love it right away, but we are better off doing our own thing than making another Japanese bike. It’s already an Inline-Four, so it was important for us to separate ourselves from the competition with regards to styling.”

As for the pricing, considering current Japanese literbikes come in right around $12,999 on average, that would currently put the S1000RR at $13,999 in base from. Of course optional equipment like DTC will come at a cost, though according to BMW these will be very competitively priced. It’s reasonable to assume that a fully-loaded S1000 would hit dealerships around $16,000-$17,000, putting it well under the equally-equipped $21,795 Ducati 1198S. We’ll believe it when we see it. But if so, BMW could have a real winner on its hands in the 1000RR.
Ruben Xaus - Phillip Island Test
"For a brand-new team with a brand new motorcycle these guys are doing an amazing job." - Ruben Xaus

Racing, Racing, Racing

In a smart move, BMW took advantage to World Superbike’s fairly loose homologation rules to use 2009 as a development year for the S1000RR by fielding a full-factory BMW Motorrad team with riders Troy Corser and Ruben Xaus.

In typical BMW fashion, instead of going the tradition route and outsourcing some of the tougher things to make, such as racing electronics, they have opted to do nearly it all in-house. But this is the BMW way. If you know anything about its racing history in other sports, when BMW wins, BMW wins. Not ones to like much help, BMW hasn’t made things easy by joining what could arguably be the most competitive form of road racing on the planet on an all-new motorcycle, one which they insist to develop as much in-house as possible.

All this considered, BMW results thus far have been impressive. Corser has been seen in the top-10 on a semi-regular basis, while Xaus pulled off an impressive fifth-place in Monza, Italy, a few weeks back. Miller was a weekend the BMW squad would rather forget, missing Superpole for the first time all season in qualifying, with Corser finishing a best of 15th in Race 1.

While BMW has been able to make impressive power from the new machine, getting it to the ground is the tougher task.
Troy Corser - Phillip Island Test
Troy Corser has been seen in the top-10 on a semi-regular basis aboard the S1000RR.

“We have plenty of power, but getting it to work in the right order is hard,” said Xaus. “But for a brand-new team with a brand new motorcycle these guys are doing an amazing job. Right now we just need to work with the electronics to get the power to the ground more smoothly and this will help in all areas (of the bike). I’m really happy to be here though and I know the bike can win once we get the time to develop it.”

In reality, though, this provides the ultimate proving grounds for the new machine and that’s what it is all about. By year’s end BMW will have raced against the best in the world at tracks all over the world with technology that will directly trickle down to the production machine.

In Our Eyes

In the process of developing the S 1000 RR  BMW Motorrad focused not only on a lightweight structure  but also on minimum dimensions as an absolutely essential requirement.
When first laying eyes on photos of the S1000RR we were a little skeptical. In the flesh our minds were quickly changed.
Having spent a great deal of time both riding and driving BMW machines, plus their extensive and impressive racing history on both two and four wheels, there’s little doubt in my mind the S1000RR will impress once in the saddle (we’ll be the first on the scene to ride it – expect a First Ride sometime in November). But the big question is: What about those looks? When first laying eyes on photos of the BMW we were a little skeptical. In the flesh our minds were quickly changed.

The asymmetrical bodywork looks sleek and fast, though very unconventional, while fit and finish is undoubtedly typical BMW first-class. And best of all, this unconventional styling has assured it is by no means a cookie-cutter Inline-Four. While still not totally sold on the green color, both the silver, black and BMW-racing inspired graphics work well and highlight the machine’s shape equally effectively – especially the BMW-racing colored edition (this will cost extra, though).

One to always impressive in terms of performance with its sports car lineup, it looks like BMW has finally followed suit in its two-wheeled department. And while it may take some time for the oddly-pointed taillight and one round headlight to grow on us, I can tell you that come shootout time next year if the bike is top of the time sheets as they say it will be, we’ll have no trouble getting to like those lights real quick. In this segment performance is the ultimate aphrodisiac, so the real answers will come in a couple months when we get a chance twist that right grip with the red mist. Stay tuned as this is shaping up to be one of the most anticipated new bikes of the upcoming season.
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Comments
ADO   July 9, 2011 09:07 PM
this is a beautiful machine im thinkingn of buying 1 next season i hope.....
Jerry -jesse sampaio are you crazy? bmw kick some azz on track? ummm okkkkk sure there  November 8, 2009 03:38 PM
it's going to take bmw another 5-10 years to develop the bike to be formidable enough to challenge the japanese bikes, i can't ever imagine bmw superbike beating an R1,gixxer 1k, cbr1000r,zx-10r or 1098R , dude you know nothing about the racing world, yamaha r1 dominated the racing world this year, winning World Superbike Championship, British Superbike Championship and Dutch Superbike championship, bmw's flagship bike wasn't even a challenge, it has a long long way to for the bike to develop into a challenger for world titles.
midwest fast - how many will actually be bought for 13800.00  November 3, 2009 08:31 PM
absolutely perfect, if it actually will be widely available and not 3 to 5000.00 over MSRP. also why such a incredible ugly color of green??
jesse sampaio -very fast bike i bet  October 21, 2009 05:34 PM
thats BMW for you. this bike is going to kick some ass on the track this year.
1 ARM BANDIT A.K.A NYC FASTEST -S1000RR  October 10, 2009 06:15 PM
I LIKE THE BIKE BUT 193 H.P LOL I THINK I COULD BE LIKE 168 H.P
Ashton -S1000 RR - review  September 13, 2009 08:13 PM
BMW meets Japanese competes with Ducati and Aprilia. I doubt BMW can stay long enough to keep customers in the Superbike market. The performance seems there, but give it 3 - 4 years, it will end up in the garage or be traded for another bike coming into the market. Unlike Ducati, power will always be there and their looks are timeless, I can respect that! With the financial crises, What is BMW thinking about? We will see, time will tell!
coen -how fast  August 31, 2009 09:53 PM
i no its a silly question but what is the top speed of the beema
Paul Salvatore -Loss Leader Pricing - Likely Home Run to Own  August 6, 2009 10:48 AM
BMW's OP machines ran with the pack at Daytona in '07. BMW has always favored strength and longevity over high performance and light weight. BMW design teams appear driven by new demographics. Will this be the "last" sport bike experienced road warriors will want to trade up to? It's on my list. Racing is the greatest development equalizer. BMW is clearly in it to win it.
Bike enthusiast -Money and optional package!!  July 11, 2009 03:05 PM
I don't get it!!! First, official information told us that traction control was going to be standard but not the ABS. Now BMW will make every single thing part of an optional package on that bike to get much more money. How can that bike be as affordable as they claim? Okay comparing the other bikes like Ducati and aprilia, BMW s1000rr is affordable; but that is why no that many people buy them in the first place!!!!!!!! We can't take away their innovation but it seems to me that this bike won’t be anything else but an excsatic expensive bike just like Ducati and aprilia. The sad thing we just act like puppet!!
Klaus -Idiots are all around us  July 4, 2009 04:54 AM
My comment is for the idiot that wrote "Manned Missile - The Skeptics just don't get it...really...suck it up and admit you'll be wrong" You sure do talk alot and do not realize that performance on a motorcycle is 70% rider and 30% motorcycle.... Japanese, German, or Italian! By the way..... you must have a really small penis!
S1000 <3 er -S 1000 RR Touring West Coast  June 22, 2009 08:31 AM
There is currently a bike touring the West Coast making stops at dealers, track days, and bike nights. Check out www.bmwplanetpower.com for up to date blogs, pics, videos and stops on it's tour. You can also check out the S1000RR West Coast Ambassador page on Facebook for more info.
Manned Missile -The Skeptics just don't get it...really...suck it up and admit you'll be wrong  June 18, 2009 03:09 PM
Dear Japanese Riding Zoomies, Never underestimate the power of the capitalist model. BMW technology is quite good. And capitalism requires you knowing your niche to survive--and clearly dominating when you decide you want to own a new one... Japan owns the "hot, young, not-much-money, bravado set". (Big balls, small brains.) Great bikes, especially in the Euro FireBlade from Honda. But, they have a Toyota-Camry-like approach. BMW are entering this Bravado Set market to own it. They will give you more performance than 99.99% of you can handle. They will establish a position as the kick-ass all-round leader, and then get you used to spending more to get more. I know this. I'm 6 cars into the Porsche brand. Once you have had a taste of the best, you can't go back. Once the zoomies have tasted the kick-ass handling and sophistication, and realize that stuff like traction control and ABS saves lives, you'll never ride a bike without it. You'll be snickering at your friends who "don't get" that the BMW aren't "square anymore". Anybody who argues that "it's a bit heavier than Japan model X" or "I don't need traction control" will see just what F1 sees year after year: add technology, reduce lap times. If you can't ride like Rossi or Stoner, or are not a licensed professional racer, you got no business making those kinds of complaints. Suck it up. Learn to love the technology. Buy some BMW. Never look back. :-)
tim -bmw  June 14, 2009 12:37 PM
looks like it's wearing a monocle.
reny -bmw s1000rr  June 13, 2009 12:29 PM
I love this bike... simply amazing... I've never heard for a road motorcycle with 193hp engine... German technology supremacy...
It's -Fugly  June 12, 2009 06:19 PM
But hopefully this leads to a 600cc-withing-$1000-of-Japanese-competition-BMW
Tom Chan -Bimmer  June 12, 2009 03:55 AM
I love it! It reminds me of my 1993 ZX7 with the ram air snout on one side. It is different and probably will not be cool with some but being different won't win everyone over. I'm guessing one side is high beam and the other low beam? The one thing I do not like is when only one side lights up. I prefer both lit up. Otherwise it looks like half vintage rc30 and half R1
Tom Chan -Bimmer  June 12, 2009 03:54 AM
I love it! It reminds me of my 1993 ZX7 with the ram air snout on one side. It is different and probably will not be cool with some but being different won't win everyone over. I'm guessing one side is high beam and the other low beam? The one thing I do not like is when only one side lights up. I prefer both lit up. Otherwise it looks like half vintage rc30 and half R1
rwc -R-6 right?  June 11, 2009 07:10 AM
I ride an R6 and thought this was a new version or somthing. I like the bike though and would like to see one in person.
Superlight -S1000RR  June 10, 2009 05:22 AM
Crocodile, if history serves, Aprilia will offer both the Factory and Standard version of their new V4 bike and the Standard model will be significantly less money than the high-zoot Factory. I wonder just how many Japanese sport bike buyers BMW will capture, given that the specs are so close to their bikes; maybe those looking for the BMW badge value will choose it over the HonKawYamZukis.
Crocodile -That's a lot of bike for not much money  June 9, 2009 09:49 AM
I wonder if they will even make money on the S1000rr for the first couple of years. I hope they don;t charge too much for TC. And Superlight, Aprilia may have a different idea with the V4 but that's going to run you well over $20k. You're not going to conquer many Jap bike buyers like that.
karl -S1000RR  June 9, 2009 09:44 AM
NOW THE GREY HAIRED R90S CROWD THAT'S HAD EVERY SPORT BIKE BMW HAS MADE INCLUDING THE K1200S NOW WILL STILL THINK THEY CAN BE A TWENTY SOMETHING AGAIN. MAYBE THEY'LL BECOME THE NEXT DEALS GAP DRAGON STICKER ON THEIR BIKE KING! OR MAYBE ALUMINUM SIDE CASES WITH PATH BLAZERS AND TAIL BLAZERS AND GPS MOUNTS. ALSO BAR RISERS AND FOOT PEG LOWERING KITS. LETS NOT FORGET THE CORBIN SEAT(EXTRA THICK)WITH THE BACK REST KIT FOR THE PASSENGER!
mxs -It's in the article  June 9, 2009 09:29 AM
Read the article and you will understand ....
Tim B -WTH?  June 9, 2009 09:16 AM
I liked this bike until I saw the front. WTH was the designer thinking giving it asymmetrical headlights?! It looks like it's got something in its one eye (headlight). WTF BMW?!
Superlight -S1000RR  June 9, 2009 09:08 AM
EWL, the problem with BMW's marketing approach on the S1000RR is that the Japanese competition can just offer ABS and Traction Control too. As I'm sure you've noticed, Honda now has a sophisticated ABS system on their 600/1000RR models for more money. The Bimmer had better outperform the Japanese in objective testing as the specs are too similar. I think Aprilia has the better idea with a V4 motor - now that's different.
EWL -warming up to it  June 9, 2009 07:01 AM
I saw the bikes in person and sat on them at MMP and it's true that they do look a LOT better in person than in photographs. I thought that the black bike in particular was very sharp. I'm very hopeful that the ABS & traction control options perform flawlessly, as these are the main selling features for the bike and will differentiate the BMW from the Japanese competition (in my opinion).
Superlight -S1000RR  June 9, 2009 05:56 AM
BMW has offered a number of engine configurations over the years, not just flat twins, so to see them have a 4-cylinder superbike is no surprise. What is strange is that they have elected to arrange those cylinders in-line, just like every Japanese superbike of the last thirty years. And having done that, they decide to style the bike unconventionally, to make it different. They will have many "options", like ABS and traction control, which will cost plenty. Sorry, but I don't see this as a marketplace winner - not enough differentiation from the norm. Maybe BMW ignored Triumph's experience with their 600 four versus their success with the 675 triple.
thesoapster -Cannot get past the front  June 9, 2009 05:25 AM
I know this bike is supposed to be great in every way and is supposed to stomp everything else, but I seriously cannot get past the front end.
Miffy -lol  June 9, 2009 05:17 AM
Ugliest bike I've ever seen! Please just make the lights match up.
Dan the Canadian -Blinker !!!!!!!!!  June 9, 2009 04:59 AM
Well most of my friends don`t like the new R1 look, realy not sure if they will like the Blink eye on it............
robert schmid -bmw bike  June 9, 2009 04:52 AM
hideous bike
Desmolicious -BMW doods say $13,500  June 8, 2009 06:03 PM
Met the BMW guys with their 'demo' bike (for show not riding) at LA's RockStore this weekend. They say it will cost $13,500. I say, heck yeah!