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AMA Rider Resources for OHV Lead Ban

Wednesday, February 18, 2009
American Motorcyclist Association Logo
Take action now: Help stop the ban on youth model OHVs

Action items to share with your club members, racers and fans.

As you may know by now, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA) has effectively banned the sale of youth off-highway vehicles (OHVs) as of Feb. 10, 2009. The AMA is issuing a repeated call for action to help reverse the potentially devastating effect this could have on the sport of OHV recreation. We are also asking for your help, as promoters and club leaders, to spread the word to your club members, racers and fans to encourage them to get involved.

While this move could cripple the future of the sport, it does appear that there may be relief for the use of motorcycles purchased prior to Feb. 10. The Congressional Research Service (CRS) has compiled a list of prohibited acts in the CPSIA. Neither riding a previously purchased motorcycle nor promoting a race that includes those motorcycles is included on that list. Download the CRS list here.

Still, immediate attention is needed to end this ban on the sale and manufacture of youth model OHVs. In addition to the efforts the AMA is putting in on Capitol Hill, all motorcyclists need to help fight this measure. Here are some quick links to background information and ways you can help reverse this decision:

• Contact your representatives in Congress by using the Take Action button in the Issues and Legislation section of the AMA website.
• Write the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) directly to encourage them to exclude youth model OHVs here.
• Click here for a page that includes suggested copy for a letter you can send to the CPSC.
• Read the AMA press release on this issue here.
• Read the AMA's comments to the CPSC here.
• Click here to download a PDF version of the CPSIA.

For regular updates on this issue, please keep a close eye on the AMA website at www.AmericanMotorcyclist.com. You also can sign up to receive AMA Legislative Alerts here.

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Comments
Stephanie Hardin -lead exposure and ruining our childrens family activities  March 22, 2009 12:53 PM
Dear Sir and those involved.This stop to children under the age of 12 happened extrememly fast, not long enough for us families to prepare. Let alone the companies. Can I ask what do you expect our boys to ride now? I have a 12 and a 9 year old they have been riding for 6 years. My 9 year old is better than his older brother and I see that one reason is because he started on the proper size bike for his age. What you are doing is dangerous to our children. Are you asking us to put them on a bike that is too big for them so that they could get hurt or ask them to stop all together. I trully believe that family activities keeps or children off the street and from selling drugs and being part of gangs or shooting up schools. My 9 year old wants to be a professional motorcross rider and is very good and he is starting to race. I believe he will be good enough to be sposered by age 14 but he need this time on his appropiate bike size to continue his training and develop his techniques. I understand the lead and the concerns, but as you know it is minimal and they have not had no health issues. Why after bailing out banks and car dealers that their cannot be a grant to replace the parts that there are concerns about. Isn't that the standard way when somnething is wrong with cars so why not with motorcycles, espeially for our youth. These youth will one day be in charge of the United states of American. They need their passions, their famaly time. If they cannot ride until after 13 how will we have proffesional riders that are any good without hurting or killing themselves without enough background and development from the age necessary to learn. My boys are so excited when we go to the track and the desert so they can ride, they see the earth and respect it, they have time with their famalies and have fun. I ask that you consider what you are really doing to our youth and other options that you have to take care of this issue.
Deanna Curtsinger -lead ban  February 19, 2009 07:39 PM
Dear Chairman Nord and Commissioner Moore: ?? My family is heavily involved in youth motorized recreation, and I’m extremely concerned with the devastating affects that the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) is having on our sport. ?? Because some youth-model off-highway motorcycles and ATVs are intended primarily for use by children ages 12 and younger, these vehicles are subject to the lead content limits specified in the CPSIA. According to motorcycle and ATV industry sources, most motorcycle and ATV components are compliant with the CPSIA’s lead limits, but some components unavoidably contain small quantities of lead in excess of the CPSIA’s limits. However, the nature and location of these components suggests a very minimal exposure risk. Although the CPSC published proposed procedures for seeking exclusion from the lead limits, there was no practical way for manufacturers and distributors of ATVs and off-highway motorcycles to seek and obtain exclusions prior to the Feb. 10 effective date for the new requirements. Thus, my motorcycle dealer can no longer sell certain youth-model machines or the parts that I need to maintain my family’s youth machines. I fear that if this issue is not addressed immediately, irreparable harm will be done to the powersports industry. Many of the small dealers and suppliers are already struggling with an unfavorable economy and will not survive the loss of their youth vehicle and parts sales. Furthermore, it is of utmost importance that young riders only ride appropriately sized machines. To suddenly eliminate the availability of all ATVs and motorcycles designed for riders ages 12 and under will likely cause some consumers to purchase vehicles that are physically too large for young riders. ?? In summary, the unreasonable and rushed implementation of the CPSIA is unwarranted and unnecessarily harmful to my family’s recreation, and may negatively affect youth motorcycle and ATV safety. ? I respectfully request that you grant the manufacturers’ and distributers’ petitions for emergency relief and temporary exclusion from the lead limits of the CPSIA. ?? Sincerely, Deanna Curtsinger
eric palmer -lead ban  February 19, 2009 07:36 PM
Dear Chairman Nord and Commissioner Moore: ?? My family is heavily involved in youth motorized recreation, and I’m extremely concerned with the devastating affects that the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) is having on our sport. ?? Because some youth-model off-highway motorcycles and ATVs are intended primarily for use by children ages 12 and younger, these vehicles are subject to the lead content limits specified in the CPSIA. According to motorcycle and ATV industry sources, most motorcycle and ATV components are compliant with the CPSIA’s lead limits, but some components unavoidably contain small quantities of lead in excess of the CPSIA’s limits. However, the nature and location of these components suggests a very minimal exposure risk. Although the CPSC published proposed procedures for seeking exclusion from the lead limits, there was no practical way for manufacturers and distributors of ATVs and off-highway motorcycles to seek and obtain exclusions prior to the Feb. 10 effective date for the new requirements. Thus, my motorcycle dealer can no longer sell certain youth-model machines or the parts that I need to maintain my family’s youth machines. I fear that if this issue is not addressed immediately, irreparable harm will be done to the powersports industry. Many of the small dealers and suppliers are already struggling with an unfavorable economy and will not survive the loss of their youth vehicle and parts sales. Furthermore, it is of utmost importance that young riders only ride appropriately sized machines. To suddenly eliminate the availability of all ATVs and motorcycles designed for riders ages 12 and under will likely cause some consumers to purchase vehicles that are physically too large for young riders. ?? In summary, the unreasonable and rushed implementation of the CPSIA is unwarranted and unnecessarily harmful to my family’s recreation, and may negatively affect youth motorcycle and ATV safety. ? I respectfully request that you grant the manufacturers’ and distributers’ petitions for emergency relief and temporary exclusion from the lead limits of the CPSIA. ?? Sincerely,Eric Palmer