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2013 Honda CBR500R vs Ninja 300 & 650 Specs

Wednesday, October 2, 2013
CBR500R-vs-Ninja-300-650-header.jpg

  Kawasaki Ninja 300   Honda CBR500R   Kawasaki Ninja 650  
Engine:   Parallel Twin   Parallel Twin   Parallel Twin  
Displacement:   296cc   471cc   649cc  
Bore x Stroke:   62 x 49mm   67 x 66.8mm   83 x 60mm  
Compression:   10.6:1   10.7:1   10.8:1  
Valvetrain:   DOHC, eight valves   DOHC, eight valves   DOHC, eight valves  
Rear Wheel Peak Horsepower:   35.41 @ 11,200 rpm   42.9 @ 8500 rpm   63.74 @ 8800 rpm  
Rear Wheel Peak Torque:   17.85 @ 9800 rpm   29.19 @ 6700 rpm   43.21 @ 7100 rpm  
Redline:   13,000 rpm   8500 rpm   11,000 rpm  
Fueling:   EFI with two 32mm throttle bodies   PGM-FI with 34mm throttle bodies   EFI with two 38mm Keihin throttle bodies  
Clutch:   Cable-actuated, FCC clutch with slipper   Cable-actuated, wet multi-plate   Cable-actuated, wet multi-plate  
Transmission:   Six-speed   Six-speed   Six-speed  
Final Drive:   Chain   Chain   Chain  
Frame:   Semi-double cradle steel   Diamond-shaped 35mm steel tubed   Twin-pipe perimeter steel  
Front Suspension:   37mm fork, 4.7 inches travel   41mm fork, 4.3 inches travel   41mm fork, 4.9 inches travel  
Rear Suspension:   Single shock, 5-position preload-adjustable, 5.2 inches travel   Single shock, 9-position preload-adjustable, 4.7 inches travel   Single offset shock, preload adjustable, 5.1 inches travel  
Front Brakes:   Two-piston caliper single 290mm disc   Two-piston Nissin calipers single 320mm disc   Two-piston Tokico calipers dual 300mm disc with ABS  
Rear Brakes:   Two-piston caliper single 22mm disc   Single Nissin caliper and 240mm disc   Single piston Tokico caliper 220mm disc with ABS  
Tires Front, Rear:   IRC RX-01R 110/70-17, 140/70-17   120/70-17, 160/60-17   Dunlop Roadsmart II 120/70-17, 160/60-17  
Wheelbase:   55.3 inches   55.5 inches   55.5 inches  
Rake:   27 degrees   25.5 degrees   25 degrees  
Trail:   3.7 inches   4.05 inches   4.3 inches  
Seat Height:   30.9 inches   30.9 inches   31.7 inches  
Fuel Capacity:   4.5 gallons   4.1 gallons   4.2 gallons  
Observed MPG:   53 mpg   54 mpg   37.4 mpg  
Estimated Range: 239 miles   221 miles   157 miles  
Measured Curb Weight:   386.5 pounds - 187.5F/199R   423 pounds - 209F/214R   464 pounds - 236F/228R  
MSRP:   $4799 base model, $4999 SE version, $5499 (as tested SE ABS model)   $5999 (as tested base model) ABS model $6499   $7499 base model, $7799 (as tested ABS model)  
Colors:   Ebony, Lime Green/Ebony SE graphics, Pearl Stardust White/Ebony SE graphics   Black, Pearl White/Blue/Red, Red   Pear Stardust White, Candy Thunder Blue, Metallic Flat Spark Black/Metallic Spark Black  
Warranty:   One year   One year   One year  


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2013 Honda CBR500R Comparison Review Video
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2013 Kawasaki Ninja 300 vs CBR500R Review Video
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2013 Kawasaki Ninja 650 vs CBR500R Review Video
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Comments
NoobDis   October 8, 2013 01:12 PM
No dood let multiple noobs ride each of the 3 bikes, for their first bike. You can't do this all at once, but you get a much better idea of what, literally, "new riders" think of them. Previous street-riding experience will compromise the survey. You could get say 27 *riders* and only use the same 3 bikes :) what you have here is the opinion of one relative "beginner" on each of the 3 bikes, coupled with the opinions of two experienced riders. Even so it's already going to be compromised by the fact that they don't have to actually buy and ride that one bike like the Average Joe would. That one fact really undermines all of the tests here. On the other hand you get a good idea of what the bikes are like used :) I an see a Ninja 300 getting flipped 5 times on the used market :) but you still raise a great idea. How hard would it be to get multiple different bike stores to source the same bike for a month? To get 5 different instances of 3 different bikes you'd only need 15. Surely in California there are 15 stores willing to loan you guys ONE bike each for a week or two. Especially a "starter-bike". I mean if you can get free rubber, and not cheap rubber either, for a Superbike and a Supersport test each year, plus the bikes :) I'm sure you can get one bike from each of 15 different stores for a week. Especially in California, for some casual street-riding. It could be epic.
MCUSA Bart   October 7, 2013 08:07 PM
WhatElsoIsNew, did you read the test? One of our test riders, Byron, is a new beginner rider. "All you have here is the opinion of experienced riders on what would make or break a good bike for beginners." And this a bad thing? "Now if you were to pick say 9 true beginning-riders, give them each a different copy of each of these 3 bikes then see if they would rather continue to ride that bike, then you might get somewhere." So we get nine true beginners, then get them different copies of three different bikes... So we just need to source 27 bikes?! And if we do that, then we "might get somewhere"... Sorry, pal, we did our best.
majortom   October 7, 2013 06:16 PM
Honda for me,EXCEPT it drives me crazy they left off the center stand rubber bumper mount stop on the muffler that is on the ugly fake ADV version! Why?????????? All practical everyday M/C's have to have a center stand as far as I'm concerned.
WhatElseIsNew   October 4, 2013 10:59 PM
There's really no point in talking about these bikes in the context of beginning-riders if you're not a beginning rider. Once you get some experience you don't have a beginning-riders perspective. You're now an experienced rider. I would think that goes double in a motorcycle-comparison. It's just like a drug-test, you can't give all 3 drugs to each test-subject and then rationally-evaluate each drug independently. All you can do is talk about how the 3 drugs work together. Now if you were to pick say 9 true beginning-riders, give them each a different copy of each of these 3 bikes then see if they would rather continue to ride that bike, then you might get somewhere. You'd still have to factor in their background and how they learn and where they ride, but at least you'd have something at least slightly objective. All you have here is the opinion of experienced riders on what would make or break a good bike for beginners. You didn't even need to test these bikes to know that.
RENDELL   October 2, 2013 09:02 PM
I'd pick the Ninja 300 because it is the most fun. Between the two big bikes I'd take the Ninja 650. The Honda is too softly sprung to have fun and if I was going to pay money to have it fixed I may as well have bought a more expensive motorcycle.