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World Superbike Regulation Changes 2013

Tuesday, March 26, 2013
Tom Sykes  66  took his third win of the season in World Superbike Race 1 at Portimao.
The Superbike Commission irons out details in the recent changes made to Sporting and Technical regulations.
The Superbike Commission made a number of amendments to Sporting and Technical Regulations in World Superbike, World Supersport and Superstock 1000cc ahead of Round 2 of the 2013 season. Some notable changes include the removal language specifying the number of mechanics allowed to touch the motorcycle during a pit stop in Superbike and the expansion of red-flag procedures over all classes. There were also revisions to suspension modifications. The World Superbike press release outlining all modifications is included below, with changes listed in bold. – MotoUSA Byron Wilson

The Superbike Commission, composed of Messrs Javier Alonso (WSBK Managing Director), Ignacio Verneda (FIM Executive Director, Sport), Takanao Tsubouchi (MSMA Representative) and Giulio Bardi (Team representative) met at the FIM Headquarters on 13 March 2013. It unanimously decided to introduce the following main modifications to the Regulations of the Road Racing Superbike & Supersport World Championship and FIM Superstock 1000cc Cup for 2013:

A number of representatives of Dorna WSBK Organization and the FIM took part in this meeting

(Messrs Daniel Carrera, Gregorio Lavilla, Rezsö Bulcsu, and Paul Duparc).

Immediate application

Sporting Regulations


1.19 Start Procedure

(…)

14) A red light will be displayed for between 2 and 5 seconds. The red light will go out to start the race
A safety car will follow behind the motorcycles for the whole of the first lap. The safety car must overtake slow riders.
If the red lights device is fed by normal power (electricity) supply, it must also be connected to a set of car batteries or to an U.P.S. (Uninterruptable Power System) to provide power to the starting lights device if the electric line breaks down just at the moment of the start.

Any rider who anticipates the start or who is deliberately not placed in his starting box will be required to carry out the ride through Procedure described under article 1.20.

Anticipation of the start is defined by the motorcycle moving forward when the red lights are on. The Race Direction will decide if a penalty will be imposed and must arrange for the team to be notified of such penalty before the end of the fourth lap.

(…)

Reason: Clarification.

1.23 PIT STOPS

Riders may enter the pits during the race.
Refueling is strictly prohibited. Any infringement of this rule will be penalized with a disqualification.

For the Superbike class only, the following procedure will also apply:

Riders who wish to change tires or make adjustments in the pit lane must stop in front of their garage, turn off the engine and dismount from their motorcycles. Only three mechanics, clearly identified with an official armband, are allowed to touch the motorcycle or work on it during the pit stop. These three mechanics cannot receive any external help in the pit lane (i.e. passing the tools from the garage, etc.), but the rider can help them if he wishes to do so.

The use of power tools (maximum two at the same time, electric or pneumatic) is allowed.

Stands or lifts must operate manually and cannot be power assisted.

The use of an auxiliary starter and/or of a booster battery is allowed to restart the motorcycle.

A marshal will monitor the situation and report any infringement of this rule which will be penalised by the Race Direction with a ride through.

Intervention time for a pit stop for tire(s) change is fixed to 30 seconds plus the necessary time to cross pit lane from entrance to exit (set time). This intervention will be monitored by the Official timekeeping company. Any rider whose pit stop is below the set time will be penalized by the Race Direction with a Ride Through.

During the pit stop, adjustments to the motorcycle are allowed.

A pit stop without a tire change is not affected by this rule.


Reason: Clarification.

1.24.1 Flags and Lights Used to Provide Information:

(…)
 
White Flag
Waved at all the flag marshal posts during the race, this flag indicates that it is raining at some parts of the circuit.
Only the Race Direction can take the decision.

(…)

Reason: To apply this flag information at any moment of the event and for all series.

1.24.2 Flags which Convey Information and Instructions:

Yellow Flag

The team is no longer advised by written notice before the ‘Ride Through’ sanction is applied.

1.27 Interruption of a race (red flag)

The procedure is reviewed and the one used in GP (with the 5 minutes rules) is now applied:
 
1.27.1

If the Race Director decides to interrupt a race, then red flags will be displayed at the finish line and at all marshals' posts and he will switch on the red lights around the circuit. Riders must immediately slow down and return to the pit lane.

The results will be the results taken at the last point where the leader and all other riders on the same lap as the leader had completed a full lap without the red flag being displayed.

Exception: if the race is interrupted after the chequered flag, the following procedure will apply:

1) For all the riders to whom the chequered flag was shown before the interruption, a partial classification will be established at the end of the last lap of the race.

2) For all the riders to whom the chequered flag was not shown before the interruption, a partial classification will be established at the end of the penultimate lap of the race.

3) The complete classification will be established by combining both partial classifications as per the lap/time procedure.

At the time the red flag is displayed, riders who are not actively competing in the race will not be classified.

Within 5 minutes after the red flag has been displayed, riders who have not entered the pit lane, pushing or riding on their motorcycle, will not be classified.


(…rest of the article remains unchanged…)

Technical Regulations

2.6.10.2 Front forks


Forks (stanchions, stem, wheel spindle, upper and lower crown, etc.) must remain as originally produced by the manufacturer for the homologated motorcycle.

Original internal parts of the homologated forks may be modified or changed.

No aftermarket or prototype electronically-controlled suspension parts may be used, unless such suspension is already present on the production model of the homologated motorcycle, and it must remain completely standard (all mechanical or electronic parts must remain as homologated, with the exception of shims and springs).

The original suspension system must work safely in the event of an electronic failure.

After market damper kits or valves may be installed.

Fork springs may be modified or replaced.

Fork caps may be modified or replaced to allow external adjustment.

Dust seals may be modified, changed or removed if the fork remains totally oil sealed.

The original surface finish of the fork tubes (stanchions, fork pipes) may be changed.

Additional surface treatments are allowed.

The upper and lower fork clamps (triple clamp, fork bridges) must remain as originally produced by the manufacturer on the homologated motorcycle.

2.6.10.4 Rear suspension unit

Rear suspension unit (shock absorber) may be modified or replaced, but the original attachments to the frame and rear fork (swing arm) must be as homologated.

Rear suspension unit and spring may be changed.

No aftermarket or prototype electronically-controlled suspension unit maybe used, unless such suspension is already present on the production model of the homologated motorcycle, and it must remain completely standard (any mechanical or electronic parts must remain as homologated with the exception of shims and springs).

The original suspension system must work safely in the event of an electronic failure.

After market damper kits or valves may be installed.

Rear spring(s) may be modified or replaced.

Rear suspension linkage must remain as originally produced by the manufacturer for the homologated motorcycle.
 
Reason: Clarifications.

About the FIM (www.fim-live.com)
The FIM (Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme) founded in 1904, is the governing body for motorcycle sport and the global advocate for motorcycling. The FIM is an independent association formed by 108 National Federations throughout the world. It is recognised as the sole competent authority in motorcycle sport by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Among its 50 FIM World Championships the main events are MotoGP, Superbike, Endurance, Motocross, Supercross, Trial, Enduro, Cross-Country Rallies and Speedway. Furthermore, the FIM is also active and involved in the following areas: public affairs, road safety, touring and protection of the environment. The FIM was the first international sports federation to impose an Environmental Code in 1994.
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Comments
moto-pat   March 28, 2013 11:15 AM
We all saw this coming. FIM is slowing them down. They can't seem to fix MotoGP so they well mess with WSBK instead. WSBK will still be much better racing despite FIM's prejudice.