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2008 Can-Am Spyder First Ride

Monday, March 12, 2007
Will the 2007 Can-Am Spyder revolutionize the motorcycle industry  We ll just have to wait and see.
Can-Am is betting the three-wheeled Spyder will revolutionize the motorcycle industry. We took the radical new design out for a spin in sunny Southern California.
Everywhere you look these days, companies are inventing or reinventing vehicles that are said to revolutionize the transportation industry. Some succeed, others fail. The vehicle Can-Am believes is going to change the way the world views the open-road riding experience is the Can-Am Spyder Roadster.

This triple-tired contrivance has garnered a load of interest from the public and has been the focus of numerous debates regarding its purpose in this industry. The most important question on everyone's mind is how does it feel?

We got our chance to find out when the Spyder was recently unveiled to the working press in San Diego, California. Attending journalists were first trained in the art of three-wheeling on a closed course, which was then followed by a guided tour of the SoCal coastline for a pithy taste of what this supposedly revolutionary ride is capable of.

Behind the scenes of this endeavor is renowned motorsports manufacturer Bombardier Recreational Products, parent company of Can-Am, Ski Doo Sea Doo, Rotax and others. With designers who have developed everything from watercraft and ATVs to snowmobiles pouring heart and soul into this project, it shouldn't really come as a surprise that something as inimitable as the Spyder is what crept out of their collective minds and onto the production line. Can-Am believes this vehicle is going to bring the motorcycle riding experience to an entirely untapped pool of consumers while offering those who already have the bug another interesting option.

Hutch takes the Can-Am Spyder through the cones. No he didn t just knock them all over.
The turning characteristics of the Spyder take some getting used to, with the rider not feeling the leaning sensation they expect on a two-wheeled vehicle.
During the Spyder introduction, the Can-Am brass announced that they believe the Roadster is going to have the same impact on the motorcycle industry as the sit-down jet-ski had on the watercraft industry. We're not here to debate that claim, but certainly people are intrigued with its concept, so let's start out with a look at what makes the Can-Am Spyder Roadster work and what its like to ride. Or drive.

At the heart of the Spyder is the chassis. The Surrounding Spar Technology (SST) steel frame wraps around the liquid-cooled BRP-Rotax 990cc V-Twin, providing the platform for the Y-architecture design that gives it the unique configuration. If you haven't already noticed, the Spyder features two wheels in front set 59.3 inches across and a single rear wheel for a lengthy 68-inch wheelbase. No lane-splitting on this thing. The front wheels are mated to the frame by a pair of steel double A-arms with 5.6 inches of suspension travel and an anti-roll bar that is a functional part of the Stability Control System (SCS).

A pair of specially designed 165/65R14 tires, mounted to either three- or four-spoke aluminum wheels, are one of the most striking features of the vehicle. That mass of rubber that makes up the forward contact patches provides plenty of cornering traction but they require a sacrifice be made. It doesn't lean over in the turns, so the rider remains upright with only a bit of dive from the suspension offered up to satisfy the railing fix. A pair of 260mm rotors, one on each wheel, work with a pair of 4-piston calipers to slow the Spyder down. They are also an integral piece of the stability system. A very, very long steel swingarm and monoshock hold a solitary wide 225/50R15 rear tire wrapped around an aluminum wheel with spokes matching the two wheels up front. A Kevlar-reinforced belt drive is on the rider's left side and a 260mm disc brake and single piston caliper equipped with all the vital ABS components is on the right.

2007 Can-Am Spyder
The Spyder's Rotax V-Twin produces a claimed 106 hp at 8500 rpm and 77 lb-ft of torque at 6250 rpm, channeling the leftovers and noise out of a 2-into-1 exhaust.
The entire braking system is linked to a single brake pedal located on the right side of the Spyder, where the rear brake pedal traditionally resides on a motorcycle. No front brake lever is to be had. This takes a bit of getting used to, especially during panic stops, when a rider's natural instinct is to grab for the lever, but the fact remains that the combined efforts of the Electronic Brake Distribution (EBD) and ABS system hauls the Spyder Roadster down from any speed in a hurry. The grouping of a linked system operated by a single pedal and the associated electronic gizmos assisting it results in not much feel transmitted back to the rider. It isn't a concern or complaint because it is similar to the systems found on BMW streetbikes these days. Plenty capable, but it takes a bit to get used to it.

Hidden under the sculpted aerodynamic bodywork is the Rotax V-Twin, an offshoot of the fun motor in Aprilia's sportbikes. This mill gets the Spyder moving right along and transmits very little vibration to the rider. Crack open the 57mm throttle bodies, allowing the multi-port fuel injection system to breathe, and the Spyder accelerates on par with any typical sports car this side of a Vette. It seems to build speed about equal to an SV650 or similar small-displacement sportbike for those who prefer a two-wheeled comparison. Can-Am claims 106 hp at 8500 rpm and an impressive 77 lb-ft of torque at 6250 rpm. Although I cannot vouch for the numbers being on target at the rear wheel, the Spyder always has plenty of power on tap as long as the tach is hovering around the 6000-rpm range. The massive 2-into-1 exhaust system really keeps the sound of the Twin in check. Fortunately a better looking, better sounding and lighter slip-on is available from Can-Am.

2007 Can-Am Spyder
A Rotax V-Twin powerplant delivers power to the rear wheel via a 5-speed gearbox, which is available in either a manual of electronic shift.
Putting that power to the single rear wheel is a 5-speed gearbox that is available in a manual or electronic shift, opting for either a traditional shift lever or push button/paddles. The test unit was a manual and it was precise and didn't require much effort to change gears. A reverse gear is standard on all models. Getting the Roadster rolling backward is similar to putting a snowmobile in reverse. Flip a switch, engage the transmission and gas it. No problem at all.

As soon as the Spyder takes to the street it begs to be ridden aggressively. Maybe because of the riding position, its sinister stance, or perhaps the knowledge of that big high-performance V-Twin powerplant lurking within the attention-grabbing lines of the bodywork (available in Full Moon Silver and Millenium (sic) Yellow), the Spyder gives off the aura that it belongs sideways with the tire smoking and the bars at full lock heading into the first turn of a ATV supermoto race. Unfortunately, it's not meant for that type of riding.

The Spyder does attract a lot of attention when you are cruising through suburbia, however, so it is as a plus for those who crave attention. And for those people who just want to ride, it actually goes down the road just fine too. The suspension actually soaks up rough roads rather well, and what it doesn't absorb the plush one-piece seat seems set to mask eagerly. The fuel tank is concealed under this same seat and requires it to be lifted to gain access. Since the front end features two front wheels, it should not come as a surprise that it is more susceptible to the side effects of trucker ruts and braking bumps. Both these street imperfections transmit movement to the bars, much like when your car tracks in the trucker ruts etched into the slow lane on the interstate. Since this happens to cars and bikes anyway, there is no reason to expect the Spyder to be immune to it.

2007 Can-Am Spyder
Out on the road the Spyder feels most like an ATV when is comes to cornering. The two tires up front also create more bar wobble with ruts and bumps than on a traditional motorcycle.
As far as cornering prowess goes, this is where the Spyder is not like any motorcycle but is similar to an ATV. For those who have ridden a sport quad with low-profile tires on asphalt, you have a pretty good idea how the Spyder feels in motion. It takes a bit of effort to turn the bars and initiate a turn, despite the presence of Can-Am's Dynamic Power Steering (DPS), but when the input reaches the tires it turns with authority. This could be a surprise to someone initially, but it quickly becomes merely the nature of the beast. It makes it fun.

The wide, flat front tires grip the road rather well, so traction is not an issue, but the rider has to put effort into making the Spyder turn, despite the presence of DPS. The effects of the pitch and roll elements and the potential for a highside are the fundamental forces working against it, and the engineers at BRP have worked diligently to protect Spyder riders from them. Heading into turns the outside suspension compresses so the inside front wheel wants to lift. Naturally the rider needs to shift body weight to the inside of the turn to maximize the available traction which is part of the different sensation associated with riding a Roadster. Using body English is definitely a part of the Spyder experience, much like a snowmobile, quad or sit-down watercraft. Is there a connection here?

After reading this you might be concerned that the 700-plus-pound Can-Am Spyder would be prone to flipping over if the rider over-cooks it into a turn, but the good news (or the bad news depending on how you look at it) is that Can-Am has taken this into account and developed the Vehicle Stability System (VSS) and Stability Control System (SCS) to ensure the Spyder riding experience is incident-free. The way it works is once the inside wheel lifts to a point determined to be dangerous by the SCS, braking power is engaged at the appropriate caliper necessary to keep the platform stabilized.

A closer look at the 2007 Can-Am Spyder stability control system.
The braking duties on the Spyder are controlled via the lone right side brake pedal. ABS and the three-wheeler's Stability Control System ensure the Spyder doesn't get out of control.
This is where opinions on these systems will start to polarize people. Is the security from getting into trouble worth the sacrifice of not being able to make that decision? Protecting riders from themselves may not be attractive to some two-wheeled stalwarts, but to a consumer that doesn't know any different, or the motorcycle rider seeking out an option to the typical motorcycle riding experience, it could be the reason for them buying a Spyder Roadster. That is exactly what Can-Am is hedging its bet on. It's safe and easy to ride. Anyone can do it. And you don't even need a motorcycle endorsement.

The Spyder may not lean into corners or split lanes but it does allow the majority of the sensations of riding a motorcycle to filter through its electronically controlled and systematically stabilized ride. The wind is still a factor, the unobstructed view of the environment you are riding through is still there, and, of course, direct contact with the outside elements like the sound of the road humming under the tires and smells of coffee shops, restaurants or the sweet ocean air still reach the senses. And that is what riding is all about isn't it? Being out there, exposed to the elements and soaking in all the Mother Nature can throw our way? The San Diego coastline was a fine olfactory backdrop to the politically correct police-escorted tour we were subjected to. The extent of our hooligan behavior was limited to a few lengthy burnouts, but we weren't there to stunt, we were there to ride.

2007 Can-Am Spyder
Sure the Spyder is a safer ride due to the ABS, VSS and SCS systems. But with his visor up you can almost read Hutch's mind, "Screw these three-letter safety systems, I just wanna do some burnouts!"
In a straight line the Spyder will light up the rear tire like no one's business, leaving a black mark on the street until it finally catches traction or starts to get sideways - and that's when the Traction Control System (TCS) kicks in and the antics come to an abrupt halt. There will be no donuts or sliding sideways out of the dealership antics here. As soon as the Spyder reaches a certain degree of yaw (sideways motion) the motor's ignition will cut-out to bring things it back into line. The ever-present Spyder stability systems are in place to ensure the riding experience is a safe one. In a sandy parking lot it was possible to bust out some drifting antics, but no such luck on the dry pavement. It's too bad, too, because that seems to be exactly what the Spyder Roadster should be allowed to do: Act the fool as a three-wheeled answer for hooligans everywhere. But Bombardier has different plans. This is a vehicle intended to fill the need for an attention-grabbing, easy-to-ride roadster with a prestigious pedigree.

Rider accommodations are definitely on the sporting side with a surprisingly sporty riding position that is reminiscent of a streetfighter with its low bars and high pegs combined with a comfortable seat and low windscreen. Passenger space appears to be pretty good, and an optional back rest looks trick and should make long distance rides easier on the significant other.

The police escort was lame  making true evaluation of the Spyder s abilities problematic. Not that we d ever break any laws.
The police escort meant our street ride was lame, er tame, making a true evaluation of the Spyder's abilities problematic. Not that we'd ever bend any traffic laws during the course of our testing routines.
As soon as you climb on board the Spyder it feels like a snowmobile, but the view ahead, replete with curved front fenders and an information laden dashboard, are reassurance that this is an on-road vehicle. The dash includes an analog tach and speedo, as well as a clean LCD screen which provides info on fuel, engine temperature, gear position, outside air temperature a clock and a digital speedometer. All switchgear and levers are traditional motorcycle-type components, with blinker and horn switches on the left bar along with the clutch lever, and the shifter is in the traditional location at the left footpeg. A twist throttle, on/off switch and starter button all reside on the right side along with the lone brake pedal located by the right peg. Mirrors include integrated turn signals and offer up an excellent view of the events taking place behind you, and all the instruments are positioned so that they can be seen with just a glance. Despite all the goodies that it does come equipped with, it is the lack of automotive-style features that stands out.

With such a prime opportunity to load the Spyder Roadster with both automotive and high-end motorcycle amenities, it is a surprise that Can-Am came up short in value-added appeal of the cockpit area. It would have been great to see an integrated satellite stereo system, navigation system, heated grips, heated seats, adjustable power windscreen or any other tasty amenities - but none of them are found on the Roadster.yet. Those extra features could put an entirely different spin on the open-road riding experience and a perfectly tie in to the allegation that the Spyder is a combination of a motorcycle and a convertible car. There is an auto-like cavernous trunk space in the front of the Spyder that's big enough (44 liters) for a sizable load of groceries, laundry, PC with monitor, camping equipment, pony keg or whatever various sundries you might want to take with you on a ride.

That's right, the Spyder Roadster is meant to be ridden, not driven. There is no steering wheel, no windshield wipers, no air bags or doors. It is not a car for those same reasons. It is an entirely new vehicle being mass-produced at a price much more affordable than similar forms of transportation - $14,999 for the base model and $16,499 for the automatic clutch version. Plus, with a two-year factory warranty, an established support network from Bombardier and a good amount of buzz surround its arrival, there is no reason to expect the Spyder won't make some sort of impact.

The 2007 Can-Am Spyder will try and fill a niche market. But is the niche there to begin with
Three wheels may be a tough sell, but considering the only current options for street-legal three-wheeler are kit trikes, the Spyder is an attractive and sportier option.
There are plenty of niche demographics that would be perfect for a vehicle like the Spyder. The largest would be those who are afraid to ride a motorcycle because of the fear of having to be strong enough to hold it up. That includes oldsters who currently only have the option of traditional kit trikes, with a single front wheel and two in the rear. Then there are folks with debilitating injuries that could easily make the transition to open road riding, which could help return some freedom of movement to their lives that an auto just cannot offer.

The list goes on, but in the end the Spyder Roadster should have a purpose in this industry. Only time will tell if it is going to be the revolutionary ride Can-Am hopes it will be.

Let us know what you think about the new Can-Am Spyder and the three-wheeled, high-performance concept in the MCUSA Forum. Click Here
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Comments
spydertoy   December 21, 2011 03:30 PM
My bike was stolen when i was on a trip. They smashed out the key module and stole the entire ignition module. what should i do to get My Can-am spyder 990rotex 2008 started again??? HELP PLEASE//?
JOHNNYROCKS -RIDER FOR OVER 40 YEARS  January 2, 2011 05:57 AM
This comment (And you don't even need a motorcycle endorsement) was made in the article. I'm from Indiand and as far as I know at least here in my State it's a 3 wheel motorcycle and requires an endorsement. If it has less than 4 wheels in Indiana, it's not a car.


Randy in NY -Super Spyder  October 30, 2010 04:54 PM
All I can say is this thing is awesome. I have rode and owned all kinds of machines and all I have to say is there is no feeling quite like it. If one word could decribe it, that word would be "orgasmic". Keep on staring at it, I love the attention !!!!!
Seven -Does it blend?  September 28, 2010 10:22 AM
I love this design but it concerns me how the tires do not rotate with the angular momentum. That means it would be easy to roll it at certain speeds. You can see that the tires are unnaturally pulling away from the rim as they are cornering, which means they fixed the rim in a rigid position. It puts your center of gravity right at the tire/rim when cornering. I would prefer they make a model where the tires tilted to compensate for velocity and gravity so that the bottom of the tire is always receiving the downward force rather than using the rim to pull the tire back into position.
audrey -Do you need a bike license to drive this in Singapore??  September 20, 2010 08:36 AM
Do you need a bike license to drive this in Singapore??
jeff -can am spyder  September 13, 2010 08:55 PM
i took one out for a trial run and 2 hrs later i was driving a brand new yellow cam am maual 5 spd..it is just plain awsome to ride.with 2 people on it rides and handles just as well..one thing i think is there should all ready have the ultra touring windshield on it before selling it..the small one isn,t worth crap..handles great on the back roads and montains of tennessee.and there right people love to stare at it and ask questions
Dave -can am spider  June 14, 2010 06:01 PM
I rode a demo spider when they came out, liked it but, there is to much computer control. Let the rider control the bike not the computer.
It could also use a little more motor, thr 998 is ok but would be a bit more fun with 30 to 40 hp more.
But on the other hand it has more go than the new Harley tri glide.
The Can Am power steering is wonderful & it does handle well, but it would be more fun if you could get the inside tire of the ground in corners or burn donuts.(to much computer) I will probably purchase one when I can no longer hold up my 2 wheeler.
Ashton Thompson -i want one  June 3, 2010 10:52 PM
i want to price for a spider so that i can save up for one
wayne -love me spyder  April 28, 2010 07:29 AM
took a spyder for a test ride in the wet.loved it bought one three weeks later.
that was 9 months and 32000km later. still love it.i wouldnt buy a two wheel as if i did i would probly be a statistic by now ,but with the spyder its differant .and i like differant.its my own mode of transport.
GOTTA LOVE DA SPYDER
Jeff -Spyder Accessories  April 22, 2010 02:53 PM
I just purchased a Spyder as well and after being an avid Sport Bike rider for years I love my new can am spyder! For all of you other Spyder owners out there check out this company Ransom Machine Works, they just released a line of Can Am Spyder Parts. I put these parts on my new spyder and everyone loves them! RansomOffroad.com and RansomMachineworks.com are where I found the parts and Extreme Kempy sells this spyder stuff as well.
Raven (Singapore) -Love it but too expensive here...  April 15, 2010 05:44 AM
I really hate the dealers here ....
They actually asking for S$40,000.00 +++ for this bike ...
I love the bike ... but no money to buy it !!!!! :(
TREKESSA HAGAN -DEPUTY  April 12, 2010 12:12 PM
WHAT IS THE ASKING PRICE OF THE CAN AM SYDER?
Grihm DeTourmination -Realist  April 3, 2010 02:42 PM
Stick a wheelchair holder on it, make it electric (Li-Ions, please!)and I'll take one! Good looking out!!! Price is an issue, social-security disability can't pay for this. Offer a price break to the disabled and write it off!
Jim Migliorato -Bike owner for over 50 years.  March 27, 2010 02:52 PM
Had two wheelers for over 50 years, my last bike was a M109r Suzuki. I am at a point now where lugging around a 640 pound two wheeler was a bit much, have owned my Spyder for three weeks and love it. Great at stop lights and good exceleration and control on the roads.
Fast Eddie -Spyder Comments  March 22, 2010 12:13 PM
Just rode one a couple hundred miles, belongs to a friends wife. She loves it. I'm an expert rider/ex-racer with 45 years riding experience. It is too "Idiot Proof!!!!!!" Just like in a performance automobile you need to be able to switch off all that electronic crap. It sucks. They should offer a high performance version with seperate F/R braking, no ABS and cancelable Stability/Traction control. High speed smoking drifts with the inside tire off the ground would be a blast. And offset the high effort steering at high speed. Like riding a fast ATV. I've also driven a T-Rex (Three wheel tandem seating, more like a car), that vehicle can drift the rear end in the corners and it is amazing! Leave the Spyder for women, old men, the handicapped and perhaps touring, I'd rather have one of these than a Gold Wing to pull a trailer... ugh!
Omega -My Can-Am Spider  September 13, 2009 08:59 PM
I love my Spider. I have a red and black one. I really bought it for the safety of riding my daughter on three wheels. She also enjoys it! I feel more confident with riding it for curves and being more seen while driving on the streets. Also its cute like me!
frank tuc -CAN AM SPYDER  September 10, 2009 01:16 PM
i have been riding bikes since i was 14 im 32 now and i owned caple hayabusas and i see this dike and went to test ride one and now i in love whit bike so i have to bring one home, now i owned two....
Mike -Bought one for wife  August 13, 2009 05:41 PM
We bought one of these in July for my Wife. She got rid of her Harley for it. I thought she was crazy...until I rode it. It is an absolute blast. We have been riding quads most of our lives, so the transition from 2 to 3 wheels was easy. In 3 weeks the spyder has gotten 1500 miles put on it. In contrast, she put 1800 in 2 years on her Harley. I actually got rid of my own Harley because she could out corner me. I now have a Buell 1125CR. On the track I could easily take her, but in real word bumpy roads and gravel, we are about the same. I would definitely recommend this to anyone.
doug -spyder-roadster  August 9, 2009 08:50 AM
at 62 been a bike freak for years and still looking for thrills not ready for the rocking chair just yet. read cycle world article on the spyder had to be 3 or 4 years ago and was very impressed by the the technology then and i'm sure they have improved since then. i live in colorado and am spoiled by the riding places though the cagers seem to be getting crazier all the time. a unit like the spyder might be able to extend the riding season here. this week one of the dealers here are offering factory demo rides in denver and am looking forward to test riding a spyder............RIDE ON!!!!!!!
buck -can-am  August 7, 2009 10:23 PM
i just got one july 2009,I have ridden all types of bikes and Im fliped out over the ride and speed this bike has.It will burn out like a car,and the atenion you get is unbeliveable from everyone 8 to 80. Im going to keep my 2 wheels and my 3 wheels, its a slick ride.
Jeremy -Can-Am  July 13, 2009 11:51 PM
I'd seriously look into one of these. Keep them rolling off the line I want to see if they do well in the used market.
Terry -MY Spyder  July 9, 2009 12:41 PM
I have just bought a new Spider this year. (2009 Red) I really like it quick, smooth and just fun. I am 55 years old and had quit riding but this has brought the FUN back in "motorcycle" You do take some flak but realising it comes from somone who has not tried one or from a non-Rider. I may have been one years ago (close minded) but the sports car/motorcycle feel is damn exciting. Thanks Cam-Am
D.Seaotter -CanAm Spyder  July 7, 2009 08:18 AM
It makes it easier for Chicks to get out and ride! I thought it to be accurate in the review as saying, "People who are afraid of riding two wheeled bikes." Basically, in a nut shell, this is for chicks!!
celeste -RE: Where can I see and ride them Northern Ca  June 22, 2009 09:06 PM
Where can I see and ride them Northern Ca
Phil.H -Traction Control  June 18, 2009 03:17 PM
Can you switch off the traction control?
F. Cruz -CanAmSpyder  June 13, 2009 07:24 PM
My Uncle just both one last week 6-5-2009 and he let me test drive this machine just now and man I was really surprice, been riding since 88 from sport bikes to a cruiser since 98 and boy I love this ride now. Hope to get one soon I just hope the price go down a little so I can afford to buy one.
Finicky -Can Am  June 8, 2009 01:02 AM
Test rode the can am a couple of days ago. The can am rides much differently than a traditional two-wheel bike on the issue of making basic turns and changing lane at high speeds. The main overall safety concern that I have. An inherent defect in the Can am design which is not well compensated for by its design. On a two wheel bike you change lanes and turn corner effortlessly by leaning into the turn. I found that riding the can am was awkward in this respect, and required a great deal of effort to hold on to the handle bars as a result of your gravity shifting weight. I found myself taking turns at slower speeds than cars just to stay seated on the Can am. Gravity wants to make you road kill. Highway speeds changing lanes becomes even more dangerous by 10x compounded and by a potential passenger holding on and double shifting weights. I did not feel secure on the can am. On a positive note the can am performs well on straight roads. The power and acceleration was invigorating, A lot of fun to ride, but I was ready to climb-off and into the comfort of a more stable platform. I found the ride to be a bit of a work out to handle the bike in city driving. Call me a wimp ! but I've owned my share of motorcycles and high performance vehicles. If you have a family to feed, this may not be the bike for you on safety concerns. Myself, single, the safety concern is not a main purchase factor for me, nor the price. The trump card is getting a measure of the resale value. The durability should not be a factor given the reliability of the rotax engines. Undecided, need more reviews and data.
Jack H. May 9, 2009 -Spyder  May 9, 2009 01:09 PM
Rode the Spyder for the first time yesterday. Love the security of the ride but it does take some getting used to if you have ridden TWO all your life. No hand break, no lean, no place to stretch your legs. For a three wheel machine the price is reasonable and accessories are great (Corbin Seat and back rest, high windshield etc)
Big Syd -Can Am Spyder  May 8, 2009 02:40 PM
I just test drove both versions yesterday. I really liked it. It brought back the memory of ATV blasting through the back country, and I had been thinking back then that it was too bad something street-legal didn't exist---now it does. My biggest worry-from the grown-up side of me is the re-sale value. The initial buy-in price is an investment, and I don't want to have to start from scratch when I decide to move up to a new one.
H.Clayton Hodge -The Spider  May 5, 2009 06:28 PM
As a top school high, and broad juumper I aquired the nick-name Spider. I love the looks, and the idea of this three wheeled machine. If the cost can be kept reasonable it should be a winner. I love it !
Luis Fernando R. -ehhhhh!  April 27, 2009 08:41 AM
no me gusta.....prefiero la cuatro ruedas
jack -build  February 13, 2009 03:16 PM
Been wantinhg to build something like ths and still wondering about the handling. I've had lots of bkes and to me this is far more car than bike sinceit doesn't lean. That being th3e case it makes more sense to make one with a seating like a car rather than upright lke a bike. I'd really like to try one to see what it's like. Saw one going down the road today and not all that impressed withit as I watched the guy driving it. Going into turns he was still leaning, but I don't know why since this thing doesn't. Looks lke he was fighting it pretty hard. Also the "controlled" steering concept scares the hell outta me. I think It would be a ong time before I would feel as safe on this or a regular trike as a bike. if it had auto type seating with seat belt and roll bar, mayb that would be ok. Also it needs to be narrowq enough to fit 2 side by side in a lane. otherwise you're still just another fullsize vehicle.
Brian -Cool  December 26, 2008 12:51 AM
Wool looking bike. I wish it was a little more reclined back though. (Feet forward)
Owen'Motorcycle routes -Can-Am Spyder  December 13, 2008 08:50 PM
Hello,I love it,there great.
Billy -Spyder  November 18, 2008 08:35 PM
I think it's a great lookin bike. Goin to the long beach cycle show in December to track test it! Hope to get one soon.
Jeff -Can-Am Price  November 18, 2008 01:26 PM
I am 59 and never ridden a motorcycle in my life. So, I guess this was a "mid-life crisis". I got my endorsement over the summer and started looking for trikes. I still don't feel comfortable on two-wheels. Most of what I saw were conversions with the cheapest, a 1994, going for $21,000. The later year models were considerably more. So, when I saw the Spyder, though the price seemed a bit high, compared to the trikes I was looking at, the Spyder was reasonable. By the way, I got a call from our local Harley dealer. Harley is now making factory trikes. Price? Starting at $32,000. The Spyder is still reasonable, and a lot of fun to ride.
MARK MARTIN -MY WIFES NEW TOY.  November 16, 2008 05:05 AM
HELLO, I HAVE BEEN RIDING DIRT BIKES SINCE I WAS 13 OR SO,43 NOW. I HAVE OWNED EVERYTHING FROM MY STILL COOL 1993 YAMAHA GTS WAY AHEAD OF ITS TIME. MY FIRST STREET BIKE WAS THE OLD HONDA HURRICANE. HAD A HONDA 500 TURBO. HAD A 99 YZF R1. HAD A 99 CARBON FIBER LOOK V-MAX WOW WHAT A NICE RIDE THAT WAS,ONE I DO MISS..CURRENTLY OWN AN 06 HD SCREAMIN EAGLE FLHTCUSE...TRADED IN FOR THIS ONE MY 01 SOFT TAIL SPRINGER SO WIFE COULD HAVE A SUPER COMFORTABLE RIDE..IN 07 AT MY HARLEY DEALER RAN ACROSS A NEW RED FXSTSSE TO REPLACE MY TRADE IN FOR THE COUCH W/WHEELS AND A 103 MOTOR. BROUGHT HOME THE 07 110 HOT ROD NICE RIDE AND FAST FOR A HD..MY WIFE PASSED HER 5 DAY CLASS AT ACES AND 8'S HAVING NEVER RIDDEN BEFORE BY HER SELF. WE TALKED AND SHE DID NOT FEEL SAFE W/JUST 2 WHEELS UNDER HER SO I TOLD HER ABOUT CAN AM SPYDER AND SHE LOVED THE WAY IT LOOKED. WE DROVE TO OUR NEAREST DEALER[MIDDLETOWN CYCLES HERE IN OHIO OFF ST RT 122] THEY HAD ONE LEFT AND IT WAS THE COLOR SHE LIKED AND THE SE5 MODEL THUMB SHIFT NO HAND CLUTCH. THE CREW AT THE DEALER SHIP WAS THE BEST I HAD EVER CAME ACROSS AT AND METRIC SHOP,SUPER GREAT PEOPLE. SO SHE SAT ON AND LOVED THE SPYDER SO I BROUGHT IT HOME..I MUST SAY I HAVE NEVER BEFORE RIDDEN BITCH, BUT FOR TWO DAYS UNTIL I WAS COMFORTABLE W/ HER BEING SOLO I RODE ON THE BACK..I MUST SAY AFTER RIDING HER ON THE BACK AND RIDING SOLO ON HER SPYDER THIS IS WAY COOL,AND LOTS OF FUN..IT IS A LITTLE CRAMPED FOR ME 6'2" 205LBS BUT FOR HER PERFECT JUST LIKE SHE IS FOR ME PERFECT...SHE LOVES HER NEW TOY, I AM GOING TO MISS HER NOT BEING BEHIND MY ON MY HOT ROD HD...BUT GREAT JOB BRP FOR BUILDING SUCH A GREAT PRODUCT AT SUCH A GOOD PRICE...
Luke - Spyder Lover -Can-Am Spyder  November 11, 2008 02:41 PM
Once you ride one, you will love it. I have 3 regular MCs and the Spyder is like a sportscar, only you have the stability of 3 wheels and ABS and TCS and SCS. The price should be in the 20s for all the technology, so I think the Spyder is very well priced. Besides, leaning into a hard turn like on an ATV adds some excitement to the ride. One thing to keep in mind, if you park it somewhere, expect a crowd when you get back to the machine.
Chuck -Can Am Spyder  November 7, 2008 12:20 PM
I love it,there great,BUT!!!,that price tag on it is up there!!!
FRANK -CAN AM  November 7, 2008 08:53 AM
LIKE THE AUTO SHIFT AND REVERSE....TIRED OF SHIFTING IN THE CITY..SHIFT UP,DOWN FIND NEUTRAL...DO OVER AND OVER LIGHT AFTER LIGHT..LIKE THE SAFETY OF 3 WHEELS ALSO
Jonas -Navy  November 6, 2008 03:09 PM
Love It! Where do I get one?