Sportbikes are NOT Beginner Bikes . . .

Posted at 4/12/2014 2:30:43 PM

skyhawk04kilo

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daftpunk said:I got a Ninja 250 as my first bike at the behest of more "experienced" riders. While I can't say I regret the decision, it definitely got boring very quickly. I only rode it for about two months before getting my GSX-R600 in 2008. I still have it and ride it to this day.

You say that new riders who experience success on 600's are the "exception", but you don't provide any data to verify that assertion. Isn't that just as fallacious as the logic you were criticizing?

I'm willing to wager that most folks who purchase a 600 as their first bike do just fine. That would make them the standard, and the ones who don't do fine the exception.

2c


I don't think anyone is saying you're probably going to have an accident if you start on a 600. What they are saying is that riders who start on a 600 are more likely to have an accident than riders who start on a 250.

Posted at 4/12/2014 3:04:42 PM

GAJ

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skyhawk04kilo said:
I don't think anyone is saying you're probably going to have an accident if you start on a 600. What they are saying is that riders who start on a 600 are more likely to have an accident than riders who start on a 250.


You are correct sir. :coolthumb:

Overall FOUR TIMES more likely to crash on an SS bike than on any other style of bike, and that statistic includes experienced riders so I would expect the multiplier to be even greater for less experienced riders.

There's a reason you get nailed on Insurance for an SS bike.

I loved mine, had it for 13 years, but grew tired of its narrow focus and abilities on the street. Truly no faster on that than on my DRZ400SM due to the nature of my riding area and the fact that my overall speed is governed by my line of sight on the twisty bumpy back roads, not my right wrist.

I think every experienced rider should own an SS bike in their riding life if they have any interest whatsoever...preferably after experiencing a track school of some kind.

A new rider?

Um, no.

I think an SS bike actually hinders the pace of learning vs. a less challenging type of motorcycle...you know, one specifically designed for the street rather than the track!

I've come to the conclusion in my 30+ year of riding that while no street bike can touch an SS bike on the track with equally skilled riders aboard I've also concluded that a competently designed street bike outshines an SS on the street in almost every way.

Supersport bike riders have death rates that are four times greater than average for all motorcycle types, says the IIHS.

Supersport motorcycles are indeed nimble and quick, but they also can be deadly," says Anne McCartt, Institute senior vice president for research. "These bikes made up less than 10 percent of registered motorcycles in 2005 but accounted for over 25 percent of rider deaths."

The fatality rates for cruiser and "standard" riders rank the lowest, at 5.7 deaths per 10,000 registered motorcycles. Touring bikes, such as the Harley example, averaged 6.5 deaths, with sport bikes totaling 10.7 deaths per 10,000.


http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2007/09/motorcycle-death-rates-doubled-supersport-bikes-the-most-dangerous/index.htm


Current bikes: F800ST, DRZ400SM

Past bikes, starting with the first in 1970: CB50, K75S, Seca 550, Nighthawk 750, TL1000S

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